The Grote Kerk was built between 1470–1498 by Anthonius Keldermans. It is dedicated to St Lawrence contains the tomb of Floris V, Count of Holland (d. 1296), a brass of 1546, and some paintings (1507). The mechanical clock has 27 bells by Melchior de Haze (1600s), and 8 modern bells. The tower bell was made by Jan Moer in 1525, with a diameter or 130 cm.

The two organs are world-famous. The smaller one, called the 'Koororgel', was built in 1511 by Jan van Covelens, and is built against the North wall of the church. It is the oldest playable organ in the Netherlands. The larger organ at the west end of the church is one of the most famous, significant and beautiful organs in the world. It was built by Jacobus Caltus van Hagerbeer, finished in 1645. The magnificent casework, which unusually stretches from floor to vault and makes the organ part of the architecture of the church, was designed by Jacob van Campen, a leading architect of the time. The enormous canvas shutters were painted by Caesar van Everdingen.

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Founded: 1470-1498
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Cliff Jonesp (11 months ago)
The church is beautiful inside and out Amazing, friendly and informative people Wonderful historical experience
Anastasia Tretjakova (13 months ago)
Enormous church. Very beautiful. Gorgeous wooden ceilings. Entrance is free. At this moment some work is being done inside, it doesn't take away from the experience (sept2020)
Pannekoek Stroop (14 months ago)
Exceptional 16th c painting on the ceiling!
Ivo van Zon (21 months ago)
Visited when the staircase and viewing platforms were still in place, which gave an unique view of both the city and the interior. Also got a nice demonstration of the bells, as a professional player was on the keys and was taking requests.
Raymond Dimech (2 years ago)
A beautiful church in this typical Dutch town of Rotterdam. Marvellous architecture and has the biggest organ in Holland. Musical performances are given regularly around the year. A great experience for history, art and music lovers. An example of culture in the city.
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