The Grote Kerk was built between 1470–1498 by Anthonius Keldermans. It is dedicated to St Lawrence contains the tomb of Floris V, Count of Holland (d. 1296), a brass of 1546, and some paintings (1507). The mechanical clock has 27 bells by Melchior de Haze (1600s), and 8 modern bells. The tower bell was made by Jan Moer in 1525, with a diameter or 130 cm.

The two organs are world-famous. The smaller one, called the 'Koororgel', was built in 1511 by Jan van Covelens, and is built against the North wall of the church. It is the oldest playable organ in the Netherlands. The larger organ at the west end of the church is one of the most famous, significant and beautiful organs in the world. It was built by Jacobus Caltus van Hagerbeer, finished in 1645. The magnificent casework, which unusually stretches from floor to vault and makes the organ part of the architecture of the church, was designed by Jacob van Campen, a leading architect of the time. The enormous canvas shutters were painted by Caesar van Everdingen.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1470-1498
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ruxandra van der Plas-Voda Ph. D. (14 months ago)
Beautiful church hosting the beautiful works of young artists like Thomas Trum.
Cliff Jonesp (2 years ago)
The church is beautiful inside and out Amazing, friendly and informative people Wonderful historical experience
Cliff Jonesp (2 years ago)
The church is beautiful inside and out Amazing, friendly and informative people Wonderful historical experience
Anastasia Tretjakova (2 years ago)
Enormous church. Very beautiful. Gorgeous wooden ceilings. Entrance is free. At this moment some work is being done inside, it doesn't take away from the experience (sept2020)
Anastasia Tretjakova (2 years ago)
Enormous church. Very beautiful. Gorgeous wooden ceilings. Entrance is free. At this moment some work is being done inside, it doesn't take away from the experience (sept2020)
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Château d'Olhain

The Château d'Olhain is probably the most famous castle of the Artois region. It is located in the middle of a lake which reflects its picturesque towers and curtain walls. It was also a major stronghold for the Artois in medieval times and testimony to the power of the Olhain family, first mentioned from the 12th century.

The existence of the castle was known early in the 13th century, but the present construction is largely the work of Jean de Nielles, who married Marie d’Olhain at the end of the 15th century.

The marriage of Alix Nielles to Jean de Berghes, Grand Veneur de France (master of hounds) to the King, meant the castle passed to this family, who kept it for more than 450 years. Once confiscated by Charles Quint, it suffered during the wars that ravaged the Artois. Besieged in 1641 by the French, it was partly demolished by the Spaniards in 1654, and finally blown-up and taken by the Dutch in 1710. Restored in 1830, it was abandoned after 1870, and sold by the last Prince of Berghes in 1900. There is also evidence that one of the castles occupants was related to Charles de Batz-Castelmore d'Artagnan, the person Alexandre Dumas based his Three Musketeers charictor d'Artagnan on.

During the World War I and World War II, the castle was requisitioned first by French troops, then Canadian and British soldiers. The current owner has restored the castle to its former glory.