The Koppelpoort is a medieval gate in Amersfoort. The gate was built between 1380 and 1425 as part of the second city wall. The whole wall was completed around 1450. The gate was attacked in 1427 during the siege of the city, but this attack was repelled.

The gate was opened and closed every day by the appointed 'wheel-turners'. A minimum of twelve wheel-turners were collected morning and evening by several guards. It was an extremely dangerous task; if they did not begin walking simultaneously, then one could fall, dragging the rest along with often fatal results. Before the gate could come down, it had to be raised, to pull out the iron pins that held it in place. Only then could it come down. While the gate was going down, walking in the wheel grew ever easier and faster, and many people stumbled and broke their limbs. The koppelpoort was also never breached.

The Koppelpoort was given its current appearance during the restoration by Pierre Cuypers in 1885 and 1886. Among other things, Cuypers removed a step between the two gates and replaced it with a slope.

The latest restoration was completed in 1996. It was carried out very cautiously, and with respect for the old building materials.

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Details

Founded: 1380-1425
Category: Castles and fortifications in Netherlands

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Richard van Rooijen (7 months ago)
Beatiful medieval entrance to city center
Rajaee zoughbi (7 months ago)
Great for shooting pics of the water canal and the gate
Suraj Chandwani (9 months ago)
Visit at night, you'll fall for the peace!
Julian Cox (9 months ago)
When dark this place never bores me. Its so beautiful at night. And when its light its still such a nice landmark.
Theresia Septarinna (11 months ago)
It's feel like we are back at old life in Netherlands. Life behind big walls then imagination how live in behind walls
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