Basilica of St. Nicholas

Amsterdam, Netherlands

The Basilica of St. Nicholas is the major Catholic church in Amsterdam. Officially the church was called St. Nicholas inside the Walls, i.e. the oldest part of the Amsterdam defence works. The architect, Adrianus Bleijs (1842-1912) designed the church basing himself on a combination of several revival styles of which Neo-Baroque and neo-Renaissance are the most prominent models.

The facade is crowned by two towers with a rose window in between. The centre of this window is formed by a bas relief depicting Christ and the four Evangelists, made in the Van den Bossche and Crevels workshop in 1886. A sculpture of the patron saint of both the church and the city of Amsterdam was placed in a niche in the upper section of the gable top. The well-known sculptor Bart van Hove (1850-1914) made the sculpture in 1886. The crossing is articulated by a large octagonal tower with a baroque dome and lantern and crowned by a cross. The basis of the groundplan is the scheme of the classic three-aisled cross-basilica, i.e. a nave, two aisles and a single transept. The choir is located as is usual, at the end of the nave. In the corners formed by the transept and the nave, two chapels are located, traditionally devoted to Mary and Joseph.

The basilica has a collection of religious murals. Above the high altar is the crown of Maximilian I, which is a symbol seen throughout Amsterdam. Inside the newly renovated church, a 19th-century Sauer Organ can be found, on which concerts are given and mass is accompanied.

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Details

Founded: 1884-1887
Category: Religious sites in Netherlands

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tim ONeil (10 months ago)
Nice structure but missing the Beauty from the Original Church
Sea Turtle (11 months ago)
Gorgeous church, worth the visit!
Trang Nguyen (11 months ago)
I would love to come in next time.
Martin Dirk Zimmer (13 months ago)
My wife said this was easily one of the most beautiful churches she had ever seen.
Lex Universe (16 months ago)
While probably not the right tourist spot, this building is a beautiful landmark of the city. And even though you may not wanna go inside, just stop buy and spare a glance at this marvel of Neo-Baroque and Neo-Gothic architecture.
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