The Beurs van Berlage was designed as a commodity exchange by architect Hendrik Petrus Berlage and constructed between 1896 and 1903. It influenced many modernist architects, in particular functionalists and the Amsterdam School. It is now used as a venue for concerts, exhibitions and conferences.

The building is constructed of red brick, with an iron and glass roof and stone piers, lintels and corbels. Its entrance is under a 40m high clock tower, while inside lie three large multi-storey halls formerly used as trading floors, with offices and communal facilities grouped around them.

The aim of the architect was to modify the styles of the past by emphasizing sweeping planes and open plan interiors. It has stylistic similarities with some earlier buildings, for instance St Pancras station and the work of H. H. Richardson in America, or the Castell dels Tres Dragons, Barcelona, by Lluís Domènech i Montaner. True to its nineteenth-century roots, it maintains the use of ornament in a civic structure.

On 2 February 2002 the civil ceremony of the wedding of Crown Prince Willem-Alexander and Máxima Zorreguieta took place in the Beurs van Berlage.

The Beurs van Berlage has a café located on the Beursplein side and the tower is also open to the public.

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    Founded: 1896-1903
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    4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    Gabrielle Ross (4 months ago)
    Nice for events and concerts.
    Claudette van Osch (10 months ago)
    Visited an exhibition twice here. Banksy and the very personal collection of Audrey Hepburn. Both were wonderful. Next to that, I just love the building.
    Jason (11 months ago)
    Magnificent building, but kinda hard to notice in the dense street nearby. The plaza in front of it is currently under construction, so it kinda ruined the solemn feeling of the bourse itself. With the public transport is very easy to come here, there are trams and metros just nearby.
    Sven Schirmer (2 years ago)
    Nice Congress center. Not all rooms are suitable for larger groups but the big ones are perfect. Technical facilities are state of the art. It was nice to attend the World Rail Festival 2019.
    Kirsty Chan (2 years ago)
    Micro Art has opened up my eyes to the word ART!! The attention to detail is phenomenal!! Micro art takes art to another level. It also poses far more challenges to the artists themselves. The exhibition although in one room, the micro detail within the masterpieces can easily be overlooked if you don't pay enough attention. Definitely a must see!!
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