Branc Castle Ruins

Podbranč, Slovakia

Branč Castle was a relatively large castle which was built probably in the second half of the 13th century. The castle together with other castles protected the roads to Moravia crossing the border of the country in the Karpaty mountains. It was was used as a refugee for local inhabitants against Osman threat in 1663. The castle was abandoned in the beginning of the 18th century, furniture from its rooms was removed, fortification destroyed and the castle started to fall into decay. Pamiatkostav Žilina was reconstructing the castle in 1968. Archeological excavation was made from 1978, nowadays the remnants of the castle wall are conservated step by step.

The short and undemanding ascent to the castle hill is worth the toil because it offers a wonderful panoramic view of the Myjavská pahorkatina hills.

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Address

500015, Podbranč, Slovakia
See all sites in Podbranč

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Slovakia

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ivi (7 months ago)
Very nice and easy walk, sutable for kids. Really nice view from the ruins.
Miroslav Hurban (7 months ago)
Enjoyed it. Very nicely reconstructed and all the facilities nearby. Missed active attractions and guides guessing it will be fixed by local authorities soon.
Boris Haring (12 months ago)
Very nice castle, free entrance, worth to see
Zdenko Kovacik (12 months ago)
Must see this spectacular ruins of castle, nicely preserved. Hikes around are easy for almost anyone. Everything is signposted and parking available. View are absolutely worth visiting.
Viktória Jančovičová (16 months ago)
Really nice views
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