The Château d'Olhain is probably the most famous castle of the Artois region. It is located in the middle of a lake which reflects its picturesque towers and curtain walls. It was also a major stronghold for the Artois in medieval times and testimony to the power of the Olhain family, first mentioned from the 12th century.

The existence of the castle was known early in the 13th century, but the present construction is largely the work of Jean de Nielles, who married Marie d’Olhain at the end of the 15th century.

The marriage of Alix Nielles to Jean de Berghes, Grand Veneur de France (master of hounds) to the King, meant the castle passed to this family, who kept it for more than 450 years. Once confiscated by Charles Quint, it suffered during the wars that ravaged the Artois. Besieged in 1641 by the French, it was partly demolished by the Spaniards in 1654, and finally blown-up and taken by the Dutch in 1710. Restored in 1830, it was abandoned after 1870, and sold by the last Prince of Berghes in 1900. There is also evidence that one of the castles occupants was related to Charles de Batz-Castelmore d'Artagnan, the person Alexandre Dumas based his Three Musketeers charictor d'Artagnan on.

During the World War I and World War II, the castle was requisitioned first by French troops, then Canadian and British soldiers. The current owner has restored the castle to its former glory.

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Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

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User Reviews

Didier Perus (13 months ago)
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Arnout DT (14 months ago)
We walked from Olhain parc down to this castle. It makes it even more stunning. The castle and the inside square is so pittoresque
C.F.S. MANS (2 years ago)
Beautifull medieval castle
FX Guillaumond (2 years ago)
Petit château de poche qui permet de retrouver toutes les fonctionnalités d'un tel ouvrage. Promenade agréable
Dashcam Nord de France (2 years ago)
Un très joli château dans un cadre agréable et pas loin du parc d'Olhain, le prix d'entrée est raisonnable, de plus, il y a un marché de Noël au mois de décembre dans la cour du château, dommage cela dis que ce marché sois si petit mais je recommande quand même d'aller y faire un tour c'est vraiment agréable de visiter cet endroit, moi qui ai l'habitude de visiter des châteaux beaucoup plus grand, j'ai été satisfait de la visite :)
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