Pajstún Castle Ruins

Borinka, Slovakia

Pajštún Castle was built in 13th century as part of a regional castle system aimed at defending the north-western border of the Kingdom of Hungary. One of the first known records mentioning the castle comes from 1314 in connection to its owner, Otto from Telesprun; many sources often, mistakenly, date the first mention of the castle to 1273. In 1390, Sigismund, the Holy Roman Emperor and King of Hungary at the time, gifted the castle to the Grafs of the nearby Svätý Jur and Pezinok.

Since 1592, the castle belonged to the influential Pálffy family. However, its condition has been progressively worsening, and with the looming Turkish danger at the time, the castle has undergone major repairs around 1645, led by an Italian engineer Filiberto Luchese, which fundamentally transformed the original 13th century core of the castle. Nevertheless, the owners of the castle soon started preferring other locations of greater convenience, and Pajštún's significance - and condition - began to decline. This was aggravated by a large fire in the mid-18th century which destroyed a large part of the castle. With its importance diminished, the repairs were merely provisional. The final blow, however, came in 1810, when Napoleon's army destroyed the castle with an explosion. The destruction was deemed unnecessary, as the castle was already abandoned and posed no military threat. The last owner of the castle, Ľudovít Károlyi abandoned his properties in 1945, the ruins of the Pajštún Castle along with other nearby mansions and possessions among them.

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Borinka, Slovakia
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Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Slovakia

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Zuzana Zrak (5 months ago)
Nice walk, a bit more people after 12 oclock. Better to go there in the morning if you dont like crowdy forest walks
Miroslav Hajnoš (6 months ago)
If you want small and no so difficult hiking in the nice forest with remains of a castle - this place is great for that. ✅
Marek Bruchatý (7 months ago)
Lovely views and interesting historical sight. Accessible by bike as well. Well worth visiting!
Samuel Slovjak (10 months ago)
Beautoful view, the trip up is exhausting but rewarding. There are no buffets or water sources up top, so be sure to pack everything necessary
Trussia Šafárikovo (11 months ago)
Great spring family walk. Wonderful weather and growing nature make us feel good in days of the virus. It is nice walking exercise, not to hard for children and easy for an adults.
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