St. Elisabeth Church

Bratislava, Slovakia

The Church of St. Elizabeth, commonly known as Blue Church is consecrated to Elisabeth of Hungary, daughter of Andrew II, who grew up in the Pressburg Castle (pozsonyi vár). It is called 'Blue Church' because of the colour of its façade, mosaics, majolicas and blue-glazed roof.

The one-nave church was built in 1907-1908, four years after the plans of Ödön Lechner to build a church in the Hungarian Art Nouveau style. The so-called Hungarian secessionist style forms dominate in the church. Lechner also drew plans of the neighbouring high school and of the vicarage.

The ground floor of the church is oval. In the foreground there is a 36.8 metre high cylindrical church tower. At first, a cupola was planned, but was never constructed; instead, a barrel vault was built, topped by a hip roof. The roof is covered with glazed bricks with decoration, for the purpose of parting.

The main and side entrances are enclosed with Romanesque double-pillars, which have an Oriental feeling. Pillars are also located near the windows. The façade was at first painted with light pastel colours. Later the church got its characteristic blue colour. A line of blue tiles and wave-strip encircles the church.

The interior is richly decorated with altarpieces. On the altar there is an illustration of St Elizabeth, depicted giving alms to the poor.

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Details

Founded: 1907-1908
Category: Religious sites in Slovakia

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alexandra Guedes (17 months ago)
So beautiful and different church. A little bit far from center but highly recommended!
Alan (18 months ago)
A lovely cute little church, in the heart of Bratislava. Love the blue colour and complements well a blue sky. Lovely place to take some photos and a top Instagram site. Walking distance from the centre also which makes it great. Opens on Sunday for Mass at noon.
Anna Marie Martinez (18 months ago)
It’s blue alright and it looked very serene in the snowy morning. Their website says they are open but when I got there at 9:20 AM the church was closed. I went in through a side door but the main worship area was closed.
Yashodeep Boob (2 years ago)
Very nice and funky looking church stricter (looks like a bubble-gum). The glazed tiling was special but it didn't feel much like a church. Check the timings of church before going. Built in 1913 it was the chapel of the nearby high school. Now a Catholic Church. Unusual so worth the walk to see .
lygia cecilia (2 years ago)
The Blue Church is a beautiful structure with its uncommon vernish. Unlike some big churches in Europe this Church has its own time table of openings. This Church Site in Urban area surrounding by apartments and Office Building with narrow streets. To reach this Church we must take walks.
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