KGB Cells Museum

Tartu, Estonia

During the 47 years of Soviet occupation in Estonia approximately 122,000 people fell victims to different repressions from the security organs and more than 30,000 of them lost their life. The South Centre of Soviet security service NKVD and later KGB was located in Tartu, in the so-called gray house.

The dungeon was located in the basement and cells have been restored to the original appearance as part of the museum's permanent exhibition. The KGB Museum reflects the Soviet occupation of Estonia and the history of Estonian Resistance Movement. In the display you can find plans drawn by the Soviet authorities for conducting deportation operations, leaflets distributed by the school children's underground organizations, objects from the GULAG prison camps, as well as a great number of other photos and documents illustrating Estonian near history.

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Address

Riia 15B, Tartu, Estonia
See all sites in Tartu

Details

Founded: 2001
Category: Museums in Estonia
Historical period: New Independency (Estonia)

More Information

linnamuuseum.tartu.ee

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Satoshi Mts (10 months ago)
This place is small, but the building still remains as original. It was a strong message just seeing the aisle and doors for prisoners' room and the torturing chair. It's a worth place to understand the modern Estonian history as well
Elin (10 months ago)
Small but interesting museum about WW2, the relationships between Russia and Estonia and also about how KGB worked and the work camps USSR had in Russia and Balticum.
Sameli Köykkä (11 months ago)
Very small but still kinda interesting considering there's not much else to see in Tartu
İsmail Urhan (16 months ago)
Very small, but very interesting. Also they are have stalin poster. I loved this.
karl Wagenlader (2 years ago)
Good but scary
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