KGB Cells Museum

Tartu, Estonia

During the 47 years of Soviet occupation in Estonia approximately 122,000 people fell victims to different repressions from the security organs and more than 30,000 of them lost their life. The South Centre of Soviet security service NKVD and later KGB was located in Tartu, in the so-called gray house.

The dungeon was located in the basement and cells have been restored to the original appearance as part of the museum's permanent exhibition. The KGB Museum reflects the Soviet occupation of Estonia and the history of Estonian Resistance Movement. In the display you can find plans drawn by the Soviet authorities for conducting deportation operations, leaflets distributed by the school children's underground organizations, objects from the GULAG prison camps, as well as a great number of other photos and documents illustrating Estonian near history.

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Address

Riia 15B, Tartu, Estonia
See all sites in Tartu

Details

Founded: 2001
Category: Museums in Estonia
Historical period: New Independency (Estonia)

More Information

linnamuuseum.tartu.ee

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

thofol (2 years ago)
Very intense exhibition. It is creepy to imagine what must have happened down here over the years. Even if this location is comparably small (e. g. in comparison to the KGB museum in Riga), it is well worth visiting.
Andre Mägi (2 years ago)
I had a ok experience there and i have to say it felt very real. The cells were really small and i would imagine how the people who were put in the cells felt.
Madis-Lennart Kiik (2 years ago)
An interesting historical place.
Anthony Fenech (2 years ago)
A place to relive the horror memories of the not too distant past. A place to be respected for the people who suffered there.
jan kuuskla (2 years ago)
Qute allright, anyway interresting.
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