The water fortress of Koluvere was established in the 13th century by the bishop’s vassal Lode. The tower fortress, convention hall and cannon tower were built later. This place has been a battlefield both during St. George’s Night uprising as well as during the Livonian war. In 1439 it became one of residences of Saare-Lääne bishop. In the 17th century the fortress was turned into a manor ensemble. In 1771 the empress of Russia – Catherine II – bought it and gave it to her lover – Prince Grigori Orlov. From that time and until 1917 the castle was used by the Russian czar’s family. Later on the building has been used as a boys’ educational establishment and as a nursing home.

At present the castle is in private ownership and being renovated. It is open in advance bookings only.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Stanislav Degtjarjov (2 years ago)
Very nice place, unfortunately it is a private area.
Anton Litvin (2 years ago)
Nice castle you can not get in to.
George On tour (2 years ago)
A castle has existed on the strategic location since the 13th century. In 1439, it came into possession of the bishop of Saare-Lääne (German: Ösel-Wiek) and functioned as one of the main residences of the bishop. During the Livonian War, a battle between an outnumbered Swedish army and a Russian army, resulting in a Swedish victory, was fought nearby. The clash, which took place in 1573, is known as the Battle of Lode. In 1560, insurgents during a peasant uprising reputedly also tried to storm the castle. Between 1646 and 1771, the castle belonged to the von Löwen family. By then it had lost its military significance and was henceforth used as an aristocratic residence. In 1771 it passed into the hands of Grigory Orlov after which it became the property of the Empress Catherine the Great. In 1786, the Empress found a use for the castle as a place of exile for Duchess Augusta of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel who had asked the Empress for protection from her violent husband, Prince Frederick of Würtemberg. She died at the estate under unclear circumstances, only 23 years old. Her grave is located in the nearby Kullamaa church, and her life has inspired plenty of local lore. In 1797, Emperor Paul I presented the estate as a gift to general Friedrich Wilhelm von Buxhoeveden. It remained in the possession of his heirs until 1919. Between 1924 and 2001, it was used by various welfare institutions
Muhv Siil (2 years ago)
Amazing place! Wonderful staff and astonishing scenery! Definitely worth a visit!
Villu Kärdi (3 years ago)
Authentic castle, restored with taste and respect to history. The coffeeshop is a bit on the spartan side, but the prices don't bite and the staff is helpful
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