Padise Manor is an 18th century historic mansion housing a boutique hotel and restaurant in the countryside of Estonia.  The manor house sits just 25 meters away from the extraordinary 14th century Padise monastery ruins.

The history of the von Ramm family and this estate begins in 1622 when King Gustav Adolf II of Sweden granted the Padise monastery ruins and surrounding land to Thomas von Ramm as a gift. The manor house, itself, was built in 1780 when the von Ramm dwelling inside the Padise Monastery burned. The von Ramm family bought back Padise Manor in the late 1990’s and currently soley owns and manages the property.

The Padise Manor Restaurant features Estonian cuisine and seating is available inside the manor’s halls or outside on a large terrace which faces the Padise Monastery ruins. The Padise Manor Hotel features 20 hotel rooms for anyone seeking a truly luxurious manor experience in the Estonian countryside.

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Address

Padise, Estonia
See all sites in Padise

Details

Founded: 1780
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

J F (4 months ago)
very well run manor, super friendly, beautiful surroundings
Arturs Maskalans (12 months ago)
Good kitchen!
Kadi Aedma-Reining (13 months ago)
Very good kitchen and nice service!
Gabor Visky (15 months ago)
Nice place, good for seminars and meetings as well.
Dr Adrian Venables (15 months ago)
Visited for a conference. Typical Manor house conference venue & was ideal of our group of up to 30. Catering very good & overall a good venue. Only criticism was that there was only 1 toilet available for us all, hence 4 stars, not 5.
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