The ruins of the medieval Šášov Castle stand above the river Hron. According to a legend, the lord of the Zvolen Castle had it built for his court joker who saved his life while hunting.

The task of the Šášov Castle was to guard the trade road and to collect toll. It became royal property in the 14th century and part of the dowry of the royal wives. In 1490 the family of Dóczy bought it from Queen Beatrix and reconstructed it into the Renaissance fort. The castle fell in decay after the Rebellion of Estates in 1708. Only some walls survive.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Slovakia

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slovakia.travel

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miro krsjak (2 years ago)
Work in progress, in various stages of restoration. One can see remains of walls, windows, nice at sunset.
Ivan Foltán (2 years ago)
Ruins under reconstruction.
Patrik Brna (2 years ago)
Very nice place for easy trip with kids. From Šášovské podhradie village it takes 15 min.on ruins of castle. Ruin is safe, you will see very lovely view on Žiar nad Hronom city. There are some fireplaces so you can have a little meal time.
Bálint (2 years ago)
Under reconstruction, 2018/05
Stefan Czibor (3 years ago)
Goat Paradise ..., ruins only...
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