St. Nicholas Orthodox Church

Tallinn, Estonia

The church, with its twin bell towers and copper dome, was designed by St. Petersburg court architect Luigi Rusca and built in 1820-27. The main iconostasis is from the 19th century and the older ones in aisles from the turn of 17th and 18th centuries. Today the church is used by the Russian Orthodox Parish of Tallinn.

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Address

Vene 24, Tallinn, Estonia
See all sites in Tallinn

Details

Founded: 1820-1827
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

TheRin30 (2 years ago)
На этом месте с XV века стоит Никольская русская церковь, давшая название улице Вене (русская). Нынешний облик церковь получила в 1823 году. На территории храма под алтарём погребён священномученик Арсений, Митрополит Ростовский.
George On tour (2 years ago)
The first Classicist church building with twin towers in Tallinn was designed by Luigi Rusca, an architect from St. Petersburg, and constructed in the period of 1820–1827. The church's valuable iconostas is almost as famous as the Zarudnev iconostas in the Church of the Transfiguration of Our Lord. The remains of Arseny, a metropolitan of Rostov and Yaroslavl, who died as a prisoner in Tallinn in 1772 and who was declared a saint in the year 2000, are located in the church. The church is administered by an orthodox congregation that belongs to the Moscow Patriarchate.
Luis Serra (2 years ago)
Igreja ortodoxa da cidade de Tallin ainda em funcionamento. Muito bonita e bem conservada. Uma visita durante o culto será muito interessante, uma vez que poderão ter acesso ao desenrolar de um ritual religioso ortodoxo. Tem uma loja dento da igreja onde se podem comprar souvenires!
ISI BALTIC A.IVANOV (2 years ago)
The oldest Church in Estonia!
Sergii Multipedia (2 years ago)
Nice
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