Saint James' Church

Stralsund, Germany

The Gothic St. Jakobikirche (Saint James' Church) was constructed as the last of the major parish churches at the beginning of the 14th century on the former divide between Stralsund’s old and new city sections. This church distinguishes itself significantly from the other church buildings in the city through its various glazed shaped stonework and the ornamental decorations on the screens and friezes. It is currently being used as a cultural and events church for readings, concerts, theatre performances and exhibitions.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.stralsundtourismus.de

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jörg S (3 years ago)
Kannste Dir ankicken!
Mi No (3 years ago)
hatten leider Pech gehabt, die Kirche war geschlossen. Trotzdem ein schönes Foto gemacht.
Andrej Delany (3 years ago)
Hier wird gerade viel renoviert und restauriert, trotzdem einmal hineingehen und das große Kirchenschiff bestaunen!
Thomas Kusche (3 years ago)
Schöne alte Hansestadt. Wir waren auf Durchreise. Viele kleine Ausstellungen, davon viele kostenfrei. Viel saniert und noch beim Sanieren. Schön, aber im alten Stadtkern fehlte irgendwie der Flair. Zuviel moderne Geschäfte (der Marke Rossmann und so).
firebird0378 (4 years ago)
Gothic!
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