Saint James' Church

Stralsund, Germany

The Gothic St. Jakobikirche (Saint James' Church) was constructed as the last of the major parish churches at the beginning of the 14th century on the former divide between Stralsund’s old and new city sections. This church distinguishes itself significantly from the other church buildings in the city through its various glazed shaped stonework and the ornamental decorations on the screens and friezes. It is currently being used as a cultural and events church for readings, concerts, theatre performances and exhibitions.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.stralsundtourismus.de

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Michelle Schröder (2 years ago)
What a stunning church!!!
Fredrik Clausson (3 years ago)
A cultural church without either culture or church - not during the day in any case. Pretty beautiful.
Carel Engelbregcht (5 years ago)
Historical
Marta Kubiś (5 years ago)
Such a beautiful building, old architecture with art exhibitions. Warto odwiedzić.
Gerard (5 years ago)
Beautiful church
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