Suurupi Lighthouses

Harjumaa, Estonia

The older lighthouse of Suurupi was built in 1760. The round old-style stone tower was built near the end of the reign of Czarina Elizaveta Petrovna, this is a magnificent example of classic Russian Imperial lighthouse design. The lighthouse was substantially rebuilt in 1812 and further renovated in 1858. The round watch room was added in 1951, and the present lantern was new in 1998.

The newer wooden lighthouse date back to the year 1859. It is 15 m high, square pyramidal, 4-story wood keeper's house with A-frame roof and painted in white. The light was formerly shown through a window on the top floor at one end of the building; it has been moved outside to the windowsill. A miraculous survivor of two world wars and over 150 winters, this remarkable lighthouse is a well-known historic landmark on Estonia's coastline. The top floor with its lantern chamber was added in 1885, increasing the tower height by 3.5 m.

Reference: Lighthouses of Northern Estonia

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1760 & 1859
Category:
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Meelis Looveer (2 years ago)
Väga kihvt. Tuletornivaht oli väga sõbralik ja põneva jutuga giidiks!
Raul Kallas (2 years ago)
Nice piece of architecture with interesting history. Visitors can get in the building and learn how lighthouse works now and how did it work in the past.
E Kallau (2 years ago)
you have to call them to come and sell tickets and let you in but otherwise very nice
Muuk Kivi (3 years ago)
The oldest and also working lighthouse in mainland Estonia, nice views, with good weather might see Hanko factory towers in Finland, an excellent ansamble of preserved outhouses. Well accessible!
Kristo Tõrra (3 years ago)
Nice and intresting.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Externsteine Stones

The Externsteine (Extern stones) is a distinctive sandstone rock formation located in the Teutoburg Forest, near the town of Horn-Bad Meinberg. The formation is a tor consisting of several tall, narrow columns of rock which rise abruptly from the surrounding wooded hills. Archaeological excavations have yielded some Upper Paleolithic stone tools dating to about 10,700 BC from 9,600 BC.

In a popular tradition going back to an idea proposed to Hermann Hamelmann in 1564, the Externsteine are identified as a sacred site of the pagan Saxons, and the location of the Irminsul (sacral pillar-like object in German paganism) idol reportedly destroyed by Charlemagne; there is however no archaeological evidence that would confirm the site's use during the relevant period.

The stones were used as the site of a hermitage in the Middle Ages, and by at least the high medieval period were the site of a Christian chapel. The Externsteine relief is a medieval depiction of the Descent from the Cross. It remains controversial whether the site was already used for Christian worship in the 8th to early 10th centuries.

The Externsteine gained prominence when Völkisch and nationalistic scholars took an interest in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This interest peaked under the Nazi regime, when the Externsteine became a focus of nazi propaganda. Today, they remain a popular tourist destination and also continue to attract Neo-Pagans and Neo-Nazis.