Suurupi Lighthouses

Harjumaa, Estonia

The older lighthouse of Suurupi was built in 1760. The round old-style stone tower was built near the end of the reign of Czarina Elizaveta Petrovna, this is a magnificent example of classic Russian Imperial lighthouse design. The lighthouse was substantially rebuilt in 1812 and further renovated in 1858. The round watch room was added in 1951, and the present lantern was new in 1998.

The newer wooden lighthouse date back to the year 1859. It is 15 m high, square pyramidal, 4-story wood keeper's house with A-frame roof and painted in white. The light was formerly shown through a window on the top floor at one end of the building; it has been moved outside to the windowsill. A miraculous survivor of two world wars and over 150 winters, this remarkable lighthouse is a well-known historic landmark on Estonia's coastline. The top floor with its lantern chamber was added in 1885, increasing the tower height by 3.5 m.

Reference: Lighthouses of Northern Estonia

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Details

Founded: 1760 & 1859
Category:
Historical period: Part of the Russian Empire (Estonia)

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Meelis Looveer (9 months ago)
Väga kihvt. Tuletornivaht oli väga sõbralik ja põneva jutuga giidiks!
Raul Kallas (11 months ago)
Nice piece of architecture with interesting history. Visitors can get in the building and learn how lighthouse works now and how did it work in the past.
E Kallau (19 months ago)
you have to call them to come and sell tickets and let you in but otherwise very nice
Muuk Kivi (2 years ago)
The oldest and also working lighthouse in mainland Estonia, nice views, with good weather might see Hanko factory towers in Finland, an excellent ansamble of preserved outhouses. Well accessible!
Kristo Tõrra (2 years ago)
Nice and intresting.
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