Eutin Castle was originally a four-winged palace originating from a medieval castle and was expanded over several centuries into a residence. The castle originally belonged to the Lübeck prince-bishops, later it became the summer residence of the Dukes of Oldenburg. The castle was regularly occupied until the 20th century and most of the interior has survived to the present-day. Today the castle houses a museum and is open to the public in summer. It is now owned by a family foundation headed by Anton-Günther, Duke of Oldenburg. The former Baroque garden was converted during the 18th and 19th century to a landscaped park; this is the venue for the Eutin festivals.

A small, late Baroque hunting lodge on the Ukleisee belongs to Eutin Castle. The lodge was built in 1776 at some distance from the main castle at the behest of Frederick Augustus I of Saxony in order to provide a single-storey pavilion for hunting parties and guests attending special occasions.

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Address

Schloßplatz 5, Eutin, Germany
See all sites in Eutin

Details

Founded: 16th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Reformation & Wars of Religion (Germany)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jix 1991 (2 months ago)
Worth a visit, very nice interior - 100% visit the garden. Moderate entry fee of 10€.
Sepp P.A51 (3 months ago)
Nice place to visit also with children!
Jeroen Verhaaff (3 months ago)
Very nice castle but the price to enter is way too high! Garden and city center is nearby so you can walk around.
Noam Zur (4 months ago)
A nice park to walk around in
Rupa Sitaula (12 months ago)
This place is quiet and calm. There is also a cafe there. Cakes were awesome but coffee was not so good. It tasted watery. You can go with your loved ones in the park and spend your day. Also you can take some breads with you to feed the ducks. They are super nice and friendly. I went there in fall but i found that if you go in summer, they will have an opera by the pond .
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