The Ring Of Brodgar Stone Circle And Henge, which is part of The Heart of Neolithic Orkney World Heritage Site, is a spectacular stone circle. The ring is surrounded by a large circular ditch or henge. The truly circular layout of the ring is an unusual attribute that singles it out as one of the largest and finest stone circles in the British Isles. The Ring of Brodgar (alternative spelling Brogar) comprises a massive ceremonial enclosure and stone circle probably dating from between 2500 and 2000 BC. Around it are at least 13 prehistoric burial mounds and a stone setting (2500-1500 BC). The erecting of the stones, along with the massive rock cut ditch was an activity that required considerable manpower and organisation.

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Address

B9055, Orkney, United Kingdom
See all sites in Orkney

Details

Founded: 2500-2000 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in United Kingdom

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Adam Eastbury (14 months ago)
Good info signs. A good sized layby to park up in. Worth seeing this then going to Skara Brae neolithic village for context.
Michelle Morgan (16 months ago)
This attraction is open to the public. You need to follow the bath around the stones as they are resting the grass on the inner ring. Very interesting to see and worth a visit
Laura Weixelbaum (16 months ago)
What an amazing place! So ancient, so mystical. Stunning! But be carefull with the curious cows!
AndresRafael StefaniSucre (17 months ago)
Ryan Owen (18 months ago)
An amazing and magical place to watch the sun rise.
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