The Ring Of Brodgar Stone Circle And Henge, which is part of The Heart of Neolithic Orkney World Heritage Site, is a spectacular stone circle. The ring is surrounded by a large circular ditch or henge. The truly circular layout of the ring is an unusual attribute that singles it out as one of the largest and finest stone circles in the British Isles. The Ring of Brodgar (alternative spelling Brogar) comprises a massive ceremonial enclosure and stone circle probably dating from between 2500 and 2000 BC. Around it are at least 13 prehistoric burial mounds and a stone setting (2500-1500 BC). The erecting of the stones, along with the massive rock cut ditch was an activity that required considerable manpower and organisation.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

B9055, Orkney, United Kingdom
See all sites in Orkney

Details

Founded: 2500-2000 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in United Kingdom

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ruth mcLennan (18 months ago)
Very windy but magnificent I liked that I could hug them
Nick Cook (19 months ago)
It's free, free car parking and pretty damn big. Good information boards from the car park to stones.
Haji Victor (2 years ago)
Awesome place...you can actually feel the age and understand why it was made a place of worship and Spiritual experience
Roger Smith (2 years ago)
Impressive! Well worth a visit. This time only the outer path was open. The inner path reveals the true majesty of this Neolithic monument.
Daniel (2 years ago)
Not much to see or do here other than park up and follow the short, circular route around the stones but even that is cool enough, given the history, to warrant a brief visit on a tour around the island. About 30-45 minutes should be more than enough for most people. A couple of information boards detailing the history of the site as you walk around would make a welcome addition.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Hluboká Castle

Hluboká Castle (Schloss Frauenberg) is considered one of the most beautiful castles in the Czech Republic. In the second half of the 13th century, a Gothic castle was built at the site. During its history, the castle was rebuilt several times. It was first expanded during the Renaissance period, then rebuilt into a Baroque castle at the order of Adam Franz von Schwarzenberg in the beginning of the 18th century. It reached its current appearance during the 19th century, when Johann Adolf II von Schwarzenberg ordered the reconstruction of the castle in the romantic style of England's Windsor Castle.

The Schwarzenbergs lived in Hluboká until the end of 1939, when the last owner (Adolph Schwarzenberg) emigrated overseas to escape from the Nazis. The Schwarzenbergs lost all of their Czech property through a special legislative Act, the Lex Schwarzenberg, in 1947.

The original royal castle of Přemysl Otakar II from the second half of the 13th century was rebuilt at the end of the 16th century by the Lords of Hradec. It received its present appearance under Count Jan Adam of Schwarzenberg. According to the English Windsor example, architects Franz Beer and F. Deworetzky built a Romantic Neo-Gothic chateau, surrounded by a 1.9 square kilometres English park here in the years 1841 to 1871. In 1940, the castle was seized from the last owner, Adolph Schwarzenberg by the Gestapo and confiscated by the government of Czechoslovakia after the end of World War II. The castle is open to public. There is a winter garden and riding-hall where the Southern Bohemian gallery exhibitions have been housed since 1956.