Broch of Borwick

Orkney, United Kingdom

The Broch of Borwick is an Iron Age living structure. It has an external diameter of 17 metres and an internal diameter of 8 metres. The walls which are 3.5 to 5 metres thick currently stand to a maximum height of 2.6 metres. The eastern half of the broch and the entrance passage are well preserved, but the western half has been destroyed by erosion. The entrance passage, which is still lintelled over, is 5.6 metres long with door-checks each formed of a slab set on edge 3 metres from the outside. A guard cell opened off the right of the passage.

The broch was once cut off from the flat land beyond by an outer wall, and there were outbuildings between the wall and the broch.

The site was excavated in 1881 by W. G. T. Watt, and the interior was cleared of debris. Ashes, bones and shells mixed with clay were found under the rubble. Beneath this was a layer of small flat stones and under this the broch floor. Finds included several combs, a small whale vertebra cup, a spindle whorl, a stone gaming piece, a whetstone, hammerstones, some stone knives and choppers, an iron rod, and some querns.

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Details

Founded: 500-200 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in United Kingdom

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

alicja pludowska (3 years ago)
Very nice easy coastal walk with unforgettable view
solaris solaris (4 years ago)
dangerous as being on the edge of the cliffs, without any fence or warnings, walk is short from yesnaby car park and you need to climb over two wooden stairs structures to overcome the fences.
Philip Bennett (5 years ago)
A lovely walk from Yesneby and truly s tranquil setting
Vincent Muir (6 years ago)
Never knew it was there till a friend told me about it,well worth a visit
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