Buda Castle is the historical castle and palace complex of the Hungarian kings in Budapest, and was first completed in 1265. Buda Castle was built on the southern tip of Castle Hill, bounded on the north by what is known as the Castle District, which is famous for its medieval, Baroque, and 19th-century houses, churches, and public buildings. The castle is a part of the Budapest UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The first citizens arrived to Castle Hill in the 13th century after the Mongolian invasion, seeking protection in the hills of Buda. The first royal castle was built around this time. The golden age of Castle Hill was in the 15th century, following the marriage of King Matthias Corvinus and Beatrix of Naples in 1476. Many Italian artists and craftsmen accompanied the new queen, and Buda became an important European city. After the Turkish occupation, Buda was in ruins. A Baroque city was built, and Castle Hill soon became the district of government. During World War II, Buda was bombed to the ground and had to be rebuilt again.

Though Castle Hill has changed much since building began in the 13th century, its main streets still follow their medieval paths. Some houses date back to the 14th and 15th centuries, giving us an idea of what the Castle District may have looked like back then. Practically every house has a plaque indicating the century in which it was built, and providing details of its history. A surprising number of the buildings are still private homes, as Castle Hill is also a residential area.

Buda Castle Hill is also home to a large interconnected cellar system that consists of natural caves created by thermal waters and man-made passageways. Inhabitants have used the caverns for centuries for storage and shelter. The earliest traces of human life found here are 500,000 years old.

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Founded: 1247-1265
Category: Castles and fortifications in Hungary

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User Reviews

Victoria Nagy (14 months ago)
Must visit place if you are in Budapest! And the all the refurbishment they have done is excellent and made the Castle so much nicer. Get ready for the cobble stones though ! It is not pleasant to walk on them with anything apart from trainers! The views are stunning and well worth the walk around there.
Claudiu (14 months ago)
Glorious The Magyars traded winning a war for having a nice city, I hope they forget nationalism and look at their history in the proper light, not the brainwashing propaganda fed to them in museums
Gabriel Zambrano (14 months ago)
Beautiful perspective, get prepared to go up through some stairs.
Carla Abrantes (15 months ago)
I didn’t not enter any of the surrounding buildings! Just went up to appreciate the view and it is stunning!!!! The castle itself is a unique piece of art!
Karina Nguyen (Karina) (15 months ago)
A gigantic palace with a rich history going back to the middle ages. Fantastic view of the whole city. I went to the history museum and it was really dense. It is shared into different categories, the first ones being about the history of the castle and the last one about the story of Buda and Pest (most interesting for me). It is quite a big museum and in 2 hours I did not even have time to finish it !
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