Hungarian Parliament Building

Budapest, Hungary

The Hungarian Parliament Building is the seat of the National Assembly of Hungary, one of Europe's oldest legislative buildings, a notable landmark of Hungary and a popular tourist destination of Budapest. It is currently the largest building in Hungary and still the highest building in Budapest.

Budapest was united from three cities in 1873 and seven years later the Diet resolved to establish a new, representative Parliament Building, expressing the sovereignty of the nation. An international competition was held, and Imre Steindl emerged as the victor; the plans of two other competitors were later also realized in the form of the Ethnographic Museum and the Hungarian Ministry of Agriculture, both of which face the Parliament Building. Construction from the winning plan was started in 1885 and the building was inaugurated on the 1000th anniversary of the country in 1896, and completed in 1904.

About one thousand people were involved in construction, during which 40 million bricks, half a million precious stones and 40 kilograms of gold were used. Since World War II the legislature became unicameral and today the government uses only a small portion of the building. During the communist regime a red star perched on the top of the dome, but was removed in 1990. Mátyás Szűrös declared the Hungarian Republic from the balcony facing Kossuth Lajos Square on 23 October 1989.

The façade displays statues of Hungarian rulers, Transylvanian leaders and famous military figures. The coats of arms of kings and dukes are depicted over the windows. The east stairs is flanked by two lions.

When entering the Parliament, visitors can walk up great ornamental stairs, see frescoes on the ceiling and pass by the bust of the creator, Imre Steindl, in a wall niche. Other statues include those of Árpád, Stephen I and John Hunyadi.

One of the famous parts of the building is the hexadecagonal (sixteen-sided) central hall, with huge chambers adjoining it: the Lower House and the Upper House. The modern National Assembly is unicameral and meets in the Lower House, while the Upper House is used as a conference and meeting room. The Holy Crown of Hungary, which is also depicted in the coat of arms of Hungary, has been displayed in the central hall since 2000.

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Details

Founded: 1885-1904
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Hungary

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Aman attwal (11 months ago)
This is one of the best parliament buildings that I've ever seen. It’s very magnificent and a has lot of details that kept me wanting to keep looking around. It is beautiful both at morning and night. For a good picture of the whole building at night time, I recommend that you to go to the Margaret bridge. From Fisherman’s Bastion, you can enjoy the view of the Parliament as well. Perfect Holidays.
Joshua Lacerda (11 months ago)
The building is beautiful. It really stands out from everything. The size of it makes it marvelous in the middle of Budapest. You can do a guided tour, which I recommend if possible. And to cruise (boat, walking, cycling) along the Danube river and check the parliament during the day or the night it's worth it. It is not by mistake that it was declared to be the most beautiful parliament building in Europe.
Petr Fordey (2 years ago)
Symbol of Budapest. In person its even larger, than you think.
Chiquita Maria (2 years ago)
A stunningly beautiful building. Absolutely worth seeing from the outside and inside, magnificent, more a castle than a parliament. Everywhere decorations, gold, colored glass, fantastically beautiful. According to TripAdvisor it is one of the most popular destinations in Europe and the world. The tour is informative, unfortunately the young chaperone is a little impatient and hardly lets one take pictures while Training at the end of the group to get a clear shot, although there is enough time for it. The Tour is 10€ at the visitor Center and really worth it and the guide was very good. In the night beautifully illuminated. Great to see the Gellertsberg. Absolutely recommendable ‐----------------------- Überwältigend schönes Gebäude. Von Außen und von Innen absolut sehenswert, prunkvolle, eher ein Schloss als ein Parlament. Überall Verzierungen, Gold, buntes Glas, traumhaft schön. Gehört laut TripAdvisor zu den beliebtesten Zielen Europas und der Welt. Die Führung ist informativ, leider ist die junge aufpasserin etwas ungeduldig und lässt Nachzügler kaum Fotos machen, obwohl Die Zeit dafür vorhanden ist. Es lohnt sich wirklich die Tour zu machen, sie kostet 10 € am visitor Center und der Guide war sehr gut. In der Nacht schön beleuchtet. Toll vom Gellertsberg zu sehen. Absolut empfehlenswert
Igor Piršić (2 years ago)
Place with a beautiful architecture, one of the most famous landmarks in Budapest. The inside of the building is beautiful and magnificent as well as the outside. The guided tour is good and informative, not too long, but gives a lot of interesting details. Taking pictures is allowed in most of the rooms.
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