Fisherman's Bastion

Budapest, Hungary

Fisherman's Bastion is a terrace in neo-Gothic and neo-Romanesque style situated on the Buda bank of the Danube, on the Castle hill in Budapest, around Matthias Church. It was designed and built between 1895 and 1902 on the plans of Frigyes Schulek. Construction of the bastion destabilised the foundations of the neighbouring 13th century Dominican Church which had to be pulled down. Between 1947–48, the son of Frigyes Schulek, János Schulek, conducted the other restoration project after its near destruction during World War II.

From the towers and the terrace a panoramic view exists of Danube, Margaret Island, Pest to the east and the Gellért Hill.

Its seven towers represent the seven Magyar tribes that settled in the Carpathian Basin in 896.

The Bastion takes its name from the guild of fishermen that was responsible for defending this stretch of the city walls in the Middle Ages. It is a viewing terrace, with many stairs and walking paths.

A bronze statue of Stephen I of Hungary mounted on a horse, erected in 1906, can be seen between the Bastion and the Matthias Church. The pedestal was made by Alajos Stróbl, based on the plans of Frigyes Schulek, in Neo-Romanesque style, with episodes illustrating the King's life.

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Founded: 1895-1902
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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Adriel Merino (3 years ago)
Best views from Pest. I’ve been blessed as it was full moon. This place is breathtaking and admirable. I love it. I could spend the evening in here seeing the sunrise the next time I came back because I loved it.
marco pracucci (3 years ago)
Maybe the best place in Budapest... awesome view. Great history and a really good place to spend some time with family, in couple or alone as well. The square in front of the Church of S.Mathius is really clean and a quiet place despite of plenty of people going around there
Sharon Hayre (3 years ago)
One of the most beautiful places to visit in Budapest. Travelled during the snow so was made especially magical. Very distinct and clean architecture. The church inside the grounds is a must see too. Cafes are located next to the bastion. Great views from the top!
raghav chawla (3 years ago)
A perfect place for a perfect view of the city, to see the Budapest parliament, the river, the skyline and much more. It's just the perfect spot. There are lots of eating options, restaurants and Talley really available. Buses run every 10 minutes and you can also hike and reach here. It's open thought-out the day but the morning and evening are just great
Noja M (4 years ago)
Having a three course lunch here in early July was like a dream. Breathtaking view all around. Good value for money. I didn't mind paying to go up to take photos. It's the best idea so the place doesn't get trashed. It doesn't become too busy either. It was clean and well kept. The downstairs 3D cinema was amazing! A very fantastic way to tell Hungary's history. It gave me goosebumps.
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