Hungarian National Gallery

Budapest, Hungary

The Hungarian National Gallery was established in 1957 as the national art museum and is located in Buda Castle. Its collections cover Hungarian art in all genres, including the works of many nineteenth- and twentieth-century Hungarian artists who worked in Paris and other locations in the West. The primary museum for international art in Budapest is the Museum of Fine Arts.

The National Gallery houses Medieval, Renaissance, Gothic art, Baroque and Renaissance Hungarian art. The collection includes wood altars from the 15th century.

The museum displays a number of works from Hungarian sculptors such as Károly Alexy, Maurice Ascalon, Miklós Borsos, Gyula Donáth, János Fadrusz, Béni Ferenczy, István Ferenczy and Miklós Izsó. It also exhibits paintings and photographs by major Hungarian artists such as Brassai and Ervin Marton, part of the circle who worked in Paris before World War II. The gallery displays the work of artists such as Mihály Munkácsy and László Paál. The museum also holds paintings by Karoly Marko, Josef Borsos, Miklos Barabas, Bertelan Szekely, Karoly Lotz, Pál Szinyei Merse, Istvan Csok, Bela Ivanyi Grunwald, Tivadar Kosztka Csontváry (Ruins of Ancient Theatre, Taormina), József Rippl-Rónai (Models), and Károly Ferenczy.

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Details

Founded: 1957
Category: Museums in Hungary

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
www.mng.hu

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Federico Besso (9 months ago)
Literally, the best art gallery I've visited so far in Europe. The pieces are amazing and they say a lot about Hungary's history and taste on art. Very talented national artist from the 1800s and on. This place should be a must stop. We spent 3 hours inside and would come back for more cultural pleasure.
Trevor Hooton (9 months ago)
Lovely museum in the castle district. The permanent exhibition has great pieces curated in a logical, interesting way. The temporary exhibit on turned out to be our favourite bit! The views from the dome overlooking the nearby buildings and over Pest are marvelous. Worth a visit!
Ung Vincent (10 months ago)
Not really visitor friendly. There are few descriptions of art pieces exposed, just a title most of the time, a short description would have been appreciated. Otherwise the place is beautiful, and the staff really kind.
Paweł Paderski (12 months ago)
Half of the time half of the gallery is closed. edit: after managing to visit the gallery I have to update my review. Amazing art.
Ádám Fejes (12 months ago)
The Gallery was really interesting and fascinating. There are 3 floors, each floor have multiple exhibitions with amazing pictures. You can spend a few hours here for sure. The stuff is very kind and helpful too.
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