Hungarian National Gallery

Budapest, Hungary

The Hungarian National Gallery was established in 1957 as the national art museum and is located in Buda Castle. Its collections cover Hungarian art in all genres, including the works of many nineteenth- and twentieth-century Hungarian artists who worked in Paris and other locations in the West. The primary museum for international art in Budapest is the Museum of Fine Arts.

The National Gallery houses Medieval, Renaissance, Gothic art, Baroque and Renaissance Hungarian art. The collection includes wood altars from the 15th century.

The museum displays a number of works from Hungarian sculptors such as Károly Alexy, Maurice Ascalon, Miklós Borsos, Gyula Donáth, János Fadrusz, Béni Ferenczy, István Ferenczy and Miklós Izsó. It also exhibits paintings and photographs by major Hungarian artists such as Brassai and Ervin Marton, part of the circle who worked in Paris before World War II. The gallery displays the work of artists such as Mihály Munkácsy and László Paál. The museum also holds paintings by Karoly Marko, Josef Borsos, Miklos Barabas, Bertelan Szekely, Karoly Lotz, Pál Szinyei Merse, Istvan Csok, Bela Ivanyi Grunwald, Tivadar Kosztka Csontváry (Ruins of Ancient Theatre, Taormina), József Rippl-Rónai (Models), and Károly Ferenczy.

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Details

Founded: 1957
Category: Museums in Hungary

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
www.mng.hu

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tregele Panna (13 months ago)
Always love to visit this museum. The exhibitions are always very well organized and they are about interesting artists. The view from the castle is the best of Budapest so it's a must to see.
jaechun won (13 months ago)
Much better than expected. Nice size not too big not too small.
Ye-Hwan Kim (13 months ago)
I did not know much about Hungarian art, so I visited without much expectation. But I had a great joy through sightseeing. The works of Hungarian artists based on the world art trend were mainly exhibited. Although it is not famous artists who are generally known, some works impressed even more.There are works related to Hungarian history as well as some works such as Gauguin and Monet. It will be a good experience if you take time to look around.
Claudia T (14 months ago)
Nice art collection of mostly great Hungarian artists. I especially enjoyed the way the collection is curated, making it easier for the novice to follow Hungary's art history
Kristofor (14 months ago)
Not allowed to take pictures. They closed approximately 30-40 minutes before official closing time. As always in Budapest - city is beautiful, people seem nice, there are plenty of things to do but the service is disgraceful. In every museum, gallery, shop (besides restaurants in my case) we ran into problems. Long waiting lines for no logical reason, earlier closing time in EVERY museum/gallery. Beautiful, but the people managing it are not
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