Pühalepa Church

Hiiumaa, Estonia

The Pühalepa Church is Hiiumaa’s oldest stone church. In 1255, the German Order started the construction of a stone fortress-church. Initially lacking a steeple, the arched stone church was completed in the 14th century, but the construction of the steeple was not started until 1770.

During the Livonian war (16th century) the Pühalepa church was plundered, but it was restored again at the beginning of the 17th century. At least it is said that the Scottish admiral Clayton, who died of plague in 1603 in Hiiumaa, was buried in the church with dignity. In the first quarter of the 17th century, the Danes plundered the church.

In 1636 the landlords of Hiiessaare (named Gentschien) donated a gorgeous stone pulpit to the congregation (rare anywhere in Estonia), thus buying themselves the right to be buried in the church choir-room. Their tombstone stands by the southern window of the choir-room.

The Soviet period was just as costly to the church as was the Livonian war. During the occupation, the church was closed, the benches were cut out, the organ was smashed and the church was turned into a warehouse. After independence was regained, the church also recovered. Now the congregation once again owns the church and most of the former church property has been returned. The altarpiece that was lost during the war has been replaced by a colourful stained glass. Services and concerts are held regularly in the church.

References: Visit Estonia, Hiiumaa.ee

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Details

Founded: 1255
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lauri Uurib (4 years ago)
Ajalooline
Anton Shevyrin (4 years ago)
Very old church.
goblis1 (4 years ago)
После посещения этой церкви на душе стало спокойно и светло.
Mauri Otsus (4 years ago)
Great looking church with a beautiful garden. Also has a drycloset outside.
Margus Tiitso (5 years ago)
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