The towerless Gothic style church of St. Catherine in Karja is the smallest church in Saaremaa island. The church was built in the late 13th or early 14th century. Although small, it is the one of the most beautiful churches in Saaremaa. The architectural design of the church is simple: a two bayed nave, a choir and a vestry. It is the sculptural decor that makes the church a real jewel. Its portals, bosses and vaulting supports are decorated with High Gothic stone decor.

The most interesting detail in the church is a relief that was later set into the wall of the porch. It depicts the scene at Calvary with Mary and John mourning for Christ.

Reference: Saaremaa.ee

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Address

Karja, Saaremaa, Estonia
See all sites in Saaremaa

Details

Founded: 13-14th century
Category: Religious sites in Estonia
Historical period: Danish and Livonian Order (Estonia)

More Information

www.saaremaa.ee
www.7is7.com

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

andrey basenko (2 years ago)
XIV century
Mateusz P. (2 years ago)
Beautiful place, special atmosphere
Chamara Wijesinghe (2 years ago)
Beautiful church well preserved in its authentic sense. The interior has the features of gothic and medieval touches and it's impressive how it has survived this long with no damaged to exterior or interior structures. Must visit if you are in this beautiful island. Recommended you read about it before or go with a guide who knows the history. Not too far from the town.
Lauri Lauter (3 years ago)
Very good
Thomas Seidenglanz (3 years ago)
Very interesting place with an almost spooky atmosphere. Definitely recommend!
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