Saint William's Church

Strasbourg, France

Saint William's Church is a gothic church is known for its sumptuous interior combining the Gothic and Baroque styles. Since the end of the 19th century, the excellent acoustics of the church has allowed it to serve as a venue for concerts of classical music, in particular for the Passions of Johann Sebastian Bach.

Returning unharmed from the Crusades, the knight Henri de Müllenheim undertook the construction of a monastery for the Hermits of Saint William, an order of mendicant monks, in this marshy neighbourhood situated extra muros, that is, beyond the city walls. The elongated building, consecrated in 1301 and realised in 1307, is the only remnant of this group. Entirely brick and unvaulted, the church corresponds well to the ideal of the order, namely by its single nave and the simplicity of its exterior form. Sheltered by a pitched roof, its nave is topped and prolonged by a deep polygonal choir illuminated by high windows, which betrays its original function as the monks' meeting room. In 1331, by reason of its proximity to the port and wharfs, the church was chosen as parish by the newly established corporation of shipbuilders.

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Details

Founded: 1301
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

3.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Isabelle Penay (7 months ago)
Beau bâtiment lumineux d'un blanc étincelant. Fermée en cours de rénovation
Cranky Kragg (9 months ago)
Une église plus humaniste que chrétienne. Punk, film d'horreurs ou je ne sais quoi sont présenter comme preuves de l'ouverture d'esprit des fidèles de la paroisse... Une hérésie sur le plan spirituel ainsi que doctrinal. Revenez a votre premier amour. Revenez a Jésus.
jojol Papa (9 months ago)
Un lieu hors du commun
christopher stahl (2 years ago)
Belle église
Hannah Lafargue (2 years ago)
Si vous passez du côté du quartier saint Etienne ou de la Krutenau, il faut absolument vous arrêter sur le pont saint Guillaume et admirer cette église ! À vrai dire, ce qu'elle a de plus remarquable, c'est son étrangeté : la perspective du bâtiment ne rime à rien ! Situé à deux pas de la magnifique école des arts décoratifs, il est réputé impossible à dessiner : serez-vous assez téméraire pour essayer ?
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