Old St. Peter's Church

Strasbourg, France

The Church of Old Saint Peter's in Strasbourg is first mentioned in 1130. On 22 May 1398 the Chapter of the Abbey of Honau, which had been in Rhinau since 1290, moved to Old St Peter's because of flooding in Rhinau. The Chapter stayed there until 1529, conducting its services in the choir, while the parish occupied the nave. When the Catholic rite was restored in 1683, the Chapter returned to the Church and stayed there until 1790, when it was wound up.

On 20 February 1529, when Strasbourg openly joined the Reformation and suspended the practice of the mass, the Church became Lutheran. Martin Bucer and the other Strasbourg reformers had campaigned for several years to have Protestant services in all of Strasbourg's churches, but in 1525 the city council had voted to retain the mass in several churches, including Old St Peter's. In 1535, in the context of the Reform, a Latin school, or 'Middle school' was opened at Old Saint Peters.

In 1683, two years after the annexation of Strasbourg by France, Louis XIV ordered that part of the Church be returned to the Catholics and that a wall be constructed inside the church by the rood screen, to restrict the Protestant services to the Nave. It was not until 2012 that a door was opened in this dividing wall.

In the 19th century, the Catholic part of the Church was extended. The extension was designed by the architect Conrath and opened in 1867.

The Catholic Church contains relics of Brigit of Kildare as well as a number of important works of art classified as Monuments historiques such as the 'Cycle of the Passion of Christ', a series of ten Gothic paintings by Heinrich Lutzelmann (1485), the 'Scenes from the Life of St Peter' an (incomplete) series of four wooden early Renaissance or late Gothic reliefs made around 1500 and a series of four 1504 paintings depicting 'Scenes of the Life of Christ after the Resurrection'.

The Lutheran part of the church, presently owned and used by a congregation within the Protestant Church of Augsburg Confession of Alsace and Lorraine, also features some notable works of art, among which the wooden Renaissance relief 'Holy Family' (1520s) by Hans Wydyz, classified as a Monument historique.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lizzy (8 months ago)
Belle église où on a le privilège de pouvoir adorer le saint Sacrement, toujours présent au niveau de la fresque de Notre Dame du perpétuel Secours. On peut aussi y écouter régulièrement des concerts d'orgues qui donnent de la vie au bâtiment et au culte qui s'y rend. Il est cependant dommage que l'Église soit souvent fermée avant 18h30, et pas à 19h comme indiqué sur le site et que les horaires d'ouverture pour les gens de passage ne soient pas plus visibles.
Tatiana Fleury (8 months ago)
Église originale car il y a d'un côté la partie catholique et d'un autre côté la partie protestante !
Charles Dirnberger (8 months ago)
Mon église paroissiale depuis toujours ! Baptême, première communion, confirmation, communion solennelle... J'y ai tout fait... Et je compte aussi y faire mes adieux sur terre pour mes funérailles. J'y ai vécu des moments de joie (Baptêmes, mariage, communions... de mes proches, mais aussi des moments de tristesse et d'adieu : grand mère, parents, oncle et tante et mon cher cousin. Mais à chaque fois, le Seigneur est là pour nous soutenir et nous donner la force et le courage de continuer !
Dylan Cam (9 months ago)
Beautiful church
MissSJ (14 months ago)
Bricks of different colours give the look of this grandiose Catholic Church a brillant glow.
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