Saint-Pierre-le-Jeune Protestant Church

Strasbourg, France

The Saint-Pierre-le-Jeune Protestant Church is one of the most important church buildings in Strasbourg. The church has been Lutheran since 1524 and its congregation forms part of the Protestant Church of Augsburg Confession of Alsace and Lorraine.

The oldest part of the church is the small lower church used as a burial crypt, which is the remains of a Columban church erected in the 7th century. Three of the four arched galleries of the cloister date from the 11th century, the fourth arched gallery is from the 14th century. The Gothic main building, with its numerous chapels and the lavish rib vault dates from the 14th century. There are many frescoes from this time and the following one-and-one-half centuries, memorial slabs and monuments, the baptismal font, the central painting of the high altar and the choir screen, now unique in Alsace, which have also been maintained.

In 1780, the now nationally famous choir organ of Johann Andreas Silbermann was built (restored in 1948 and 1966 according to the rules of the Organ reform movement). Helmut Walcha recorded a large part of his performances of Bach's organ works here. The pulpit also dates from the same century, as well as another altar.

Between 1897 and 1901, the church, which had fallen into disrepair, was fundamentally overhauled by the Karlsruhe architect Carl Schäfer, one of the most important representatives of neo-Gothic sacred architecture in Germany. At that time, the entrance was moved to the side and a new main portal was created, a copy of the northern entrance of the facade of the Strasbourg Cathedral. The cloisters were painted in polychrome, following the example of the Hortus Deliciarum. The life-sized baptismal angel statue, along with the chapel and the choir glass windows, also date from this time.

An organ built in 1762 by Johann Andreas Silbermann in the Catholic part of the two-part church of that time was transferred in 1865 to the St. Moriz Church of the parish of Soultz-les-Bains. There, it has been restored to its 1848 condition, a compromise between the original baroque Silbermann settings and the later Romantic tone and harmonic extensions, by the family of Alfred Kern & fils between 2006 and 2008.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Cherry Yang (4 years ago)
Beautiful Church! If you only had time to see one church in Strasbourg, it is this one. The locals think so, too. The frescoes are lovely. I visited during the evening so it was too dark to go outside into the cloisters, but my Airbnb host raved about it like one would for a good restaurant. Opening hours around Christmas were: 12h-18h everyday, closed Monday Tuesday, Wednesday until 16th December 2018.
Don Cripe (5 years ago)
Interesting because of sharing the building between Catholic and Protestant congregations.
Marcelo Ferreto Bispo (5 years ago)
Amazing medieval church, very well maintained, moves yourself to hundreds of years ago. If you are lucky might find someone playing the ancient pipe organ during your visit. Pay attention to the details, there are paintings and history everywhere. Enjoy the peace and the beauty of this stunning place!
Zsóriel (5 years ago)
I'm still stunned. Beautiful, ancient and eerie. As a great fan of romanesque and gothic architecture and sculpture I have to say this one is really magnificent! The most beautiful place I ever saw. There's no entrance fee, but you should leave a few euros in the box to help a bit the restoration. This church worth more than a lot of other ones what asking for money to get in.
Herr Em (5 years ago)
Go there. It is really great
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