Saku Brewery Museum

Saku, Estonia

The brewing traditions of Saku Brewery reach back to the beginning of the 19th century. The Saku estate was owned by count Karl Friedrich Rehbinder who built a distillery and a brewery on his estate. The brewery was first documented in October 1820. It is believed that the production of beer, for the purpose of sale to pubs and taverns begun during the autumn of that year. From the end of 19th century onward Saku has remained among the leading breweries in Estonia.

The brewery museum exhibits interesting beer related relics from the days of yore, take the tour of the operational brewery and hoist a few back or grab a bite in Brewhouse Pub.

Reference: Wikipedia

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Address

Tallinna mnt 2, Saku, Estonia
See all sites in Saku

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Category: Museums in Estonia

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

eero nigumann (3 years ago)
Decent food and lovely atmosphere!
Jani Haapala (4 years ago)
Fabulous place with very nice beers and good food. The brewery tour was nice
Jan de Vries (4 years ago)
The Saku brewery has a pub where you can have lunch during the day or buy takeaway food. The weekends offer live music with ever-changing music groups. In summer, an outdoor terrace for up to 25 people provides space for not only the best beers in the Saku Brewery, but also dishes. A table for making Lego bricks is available for children. So can the whole family Visit beer museum exhibition about the history and traditions of brewing. The exhibition can also be found in the premises of the brewery pub. The best thing is the good beer coming directly from the brewery. You should definitely plan a visit.
Seppo Virtanen (5 years ago)
Great beer nice cousy place food was shaped to taste with saku lager light or dark
Graham Robinson (5 years ago)
Nice beer
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