Saku Brewery Museum

Saku, Estonia

The brewing traditions of Saku Brewery reach back to the beginning of the 19th century. The Saku estate was owned by count Karl Friedrich Rehbinder who built a distillery and a brewery on his estate. The brewery was first documented in October 1820. It is believed that the production of beer, for the purpose of sale to pubs and taverns begun during the autumn of that year. From the end of 19th century onward Saku has remained among the leading breweries in Estonia.

The brewery museum exhibits interesting beer related relics from the days of yore, take the tour of the operational brewery and hoist a few back or grab a bite in Brewhouse Pub.

Reference: Wikipedia

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Address

Tallinna mnt 2, Saku, Estonia
See all sites in Saku

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Category: Museums in Estonia

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Seppo Virtanen (2 years ago)
Great beer nice cousy place food was shaped to taste with saku lager light or dark
Graham Robinson (2 years ago)
Nice beer
Elizabeth Toney (2 years ago)
Nice bartender, only a couple beers on tap due to the small bar, but really good ones! Would have liked to see more about the history, the bar space is huge.
Mihkel Jõhvik (2 years ago)
Good pub food, especially the club sandwich. No table service.
jali masalin (2 years ago)
Interesting presentation but weird that none of the production lines were active in the packaging factory at the time. Good tasting though.
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