St. Mary's Church

Waase, Germany

The chapel created in 1291 by Cistercian monks assumed its present shape in 1440 when it was rebuilt as a St. Mary's brick church. The half-timber framed nave (oak beams with brick fillings) was constructed in the 16th and 17th centuries with the choir annex added in the 18th century. Later restoration works served to expose paintings from around 1470 on the walls and the triumphal arch. The oldest decorative features are the Gothic triumphal crucifix (around 1500) and the Gothic carved altar created in 1520 at Antwerp. This altar is considered one of the truly outstanding sacred works of art anywhere in Northern Germany and bears close stylistic resemblances to the Bordesholm Altar at Schleswig by Hans Brüggemann and Jan Bormann’s altar for the Güstrow parish church made in Brussels at roughly the same period. The altar was originally acquired by wealthy merchants from Stralsund for a local Church and found its way to its present location only in 1708. The pulpit was originally made for another church, too, probably again in Stralsund, and the and brass chandelier also comes from there.

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Details

Founded: 1440
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.eurob.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Holger Stridde (6 months ago)
Unfortunately we could only look at the church from the outside as it was closed when we visited. However, the area is designed in an interesting way and there were colonies of birds (crows?) In the trees by the parking lots during our visit. It was impressive how they scolded us when we disturbed them with our presence.
Angelika Schulz (3 years ago)
Very nice
Angelika Schulz (3 years ago)
very nice
Dieter Heinemann (3 years ago)
A beautiful old church is worth a look
Dieter Heinemann (3 years ago)
A beautiful old church is worth a look
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