Vilmnitz Church

Vilmnitz, Germany

The Imposing Vilmnitz brick church was built in the mid-13th century with double square choir and rib-vaulting. Shortly afterwards, the sacristy to the north was built. Square-hewn fieldstones in the base of the wall point to the early date of building for the choir and the sacristy. Originally there was a narrower nave, completed at about the mid-14th century at the latest. In the 15th century it was demolished and replaced by the present structure. The square, three-storey tower to the west was completed in the late 15th century. The bell dates from 1554. The choir was converted in 1600 into a memorial church by the Putbus family. The simple, Baroque southern narthex was added in the second half of the 18th century to provide access to the patron’s box. An oriel-like extension to the sacristy was added in the 18th century. The church was thoroughly restored in 1906/07. All windows are ogival. The interior is whitewashed. The floor is a few steps higher in the choir, paved with brick tiles (two stamped “1709” and “1762”).

Oldest items are the tomb slab dating from 1533 (originally served to cover the Putbus burial vault), masonry altar block and three crosses in the limestone table slab. Otherwise all furnishings are post-Reformation. Burial vault with 27 splendidly ornamented Putbus family coffins from the period 1637-1856 are worth of seeing.

Churchyard is worth visiting, fieldstone filling wall, 84 gravestones from the 19th century, 12 cast-iron crosses. Picturesque ensemble, church on the hill, churchyard, schoolhouse, and vicarage.

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Details

Founded: c. 1250
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.eurob.org

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Michael W (2 years ago)
Wer sich für Geschichte interessiert, kann sich hier mit ein wenig Phantasie um hunderte Jahre in die Vergangenheit versetzen. Leider war die Kirche verschlossen,so dass eine Besichtigung des Inneren nicht möglich war.
SaturasHH (2 years ago)
Jörg Bremer (2 years ago)
Ralph Thormann (4 years ago)
Schöne alte Kirche, kurze Erklärung zum geschichtlichen Hintergrund. Scheinbar keine öffentliche Besichtigung der Kirche von innen.
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