St. George’s Church

Wiek, Germany

St. George’s Church in Wiek was built in several phases from about 1400 onwards to the site of an early structure mentioned in 1318. Brick building on carefully hewn large boulders in the foundation and lower courses. Two choir bays and sacristy from the first building phase, with four cross-vaulted, three-aisle nave bays and narthex added a little later. At various places, late Medieval murals and crosses from about 1500 have been uncovered in the vault. The burial vault was added in 1787 and free-standing bell-cote around 1600. The complete restoration was made in 1826.

Oldest furnishing is the limestone font from 1250 (probably from the preceding building). Worth noting are also late-Medieval equestrian statue of a St. George sitting upright in the saddle with open visor and hair to his shoulders, dating from the early 15th century (a gift from a Pomeranian duchess on the consecration of the church), rood beam with crucifix of the triumphal cross ensemble dating from 1300 and figures of Mary (about 1500) and John from the second half of the 15th century (probably assembled in 1826).

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

Jungfernstieg 1, Wiek, Germany
See all sites in Wiek

Details

Founded: c. 1400
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

www.eurob.org

User Reviews

Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Gruyères Castle

The Castle of Gruyères is one of the most famous in Switzerland. It was built between 1270 and 1282, following the typical square plan of the fortifications in Savoy. It was the property of the Counts of Gruyères until the bankruptcy of the Count Michel in 1554. His creditors the cantons of Fribourg and Bern shared his earldom. From 1555 to 1798 the castle became residence to the bailiffs and then to the prefects sent by Fribourg.

In 1849 the castle was sold to the Bovy and Balland families, who used the castle as their summer residency and restored it. The castle was then bought back by the canton of Fribourg in 1938, made into a museum and opened to the public. Since 1993, a foundation ensures the conservation as well as the highlighting of the building and the art collection.

The castle is the home of three capes of the Order of the Golden Fleece. They were part of the war booty captured by the Swiss Confederates (which included troops from Gruyères) at the Battle of Morat against Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy in 1476. As Charles the Bold was celebrating the anniversary of his father's death, one of the capes is a black velvet sacerdotal vestment with Philip the Good's emblem sewn into it.

A collection of landscapes by 19th century artists Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, Barthélemy Menn and others are on display in the castle.