Celtic Museum Heuneburg

Hundersingen, Germany

The Celtic Museum Heuneburg features the original finds discovered throughout the many years of excavation at the Heuneburg. The exhibits underline the active trading contacts with other cultures: Greek imports, amber from the Baltic Sea, jewellery from Slovenia, transport amphoras from Marseilles.

From 1983 the former tithe barn in Hundersingen has been used as the Heuneburg Museum. This museum was operated until 2000 by the Heuneburg Museum Association. In 2000/2001 the Heuneburg Museum was redesigned.

Only 2 km from the Heuneburg Museum there is the Heuneburg – an early celtic princely residence. It is one of the most important archaeological sites in Central Europe. In fact, it is considered to be the oldest town in the Northern Alpine Region. The excavated features leave little doubt that during the early Iron Age (circa 620 – 480 BC) the Heuneburg area was an important economic and political centre. Today it is assumed that the Heuneburg area is one of the places where Celtic art and culture developed.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 700 BC
Category: Museums in Germany
Historical period: Iron Age (Germany)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

H. M. (2 months ago)
Somewhat little to see in terms of exhibits. Lots of posters with information, but little interaction. The corner for the children was designed more interesting. We expected a little more.
Thomas Weixlgartner (2 months ago)
The area is very spacious, but the five houses built and the small part of the walk-on wall only give an idea of ​​the extent of the former size. In the large main house it is beautifully documented how the archaeologists find out about skeletons and their lives and diseases. It also shows how newer archaeological methods can be used.
Cologne 1975 (5 months ago)
beautiful place, offers a lot of relaxation opportunities
Moritz Schiegg (12 months ago)
The cloudy weather with small showers resulted in a very idyllic atmosphere, and the very beautiful reconstruction made it easy to go back in time. Also very well informed, I learned a lot. Some reviews say that the museum is rather unsuitable for children. However, this should be clear to parents. Children want to live here and now and can work with numbers like 620 BC. Do nothing ...
Alex Nexinex (2 years ago)
Nice and modern, cozy house, but it's small and you just read walls of text.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Château de Falaise

Château de Falaise is best known as a castle, where William the Conqueror, the son of Duke Robert of Normandy, was born in about 1028. William went on to conquer England and become king and possession of the castle descended through his heirs until the 13th century when it was captured by King Philip II of France. Possession of the castle changed hands several times during the Hundred Years' War. The castle was deserted during the 17th century. Since 1840 it has been protected as a monument historique.

The castle (12th–13th century), which overlooks the town from a high crag, was formerly the seat of the Dukes of Normandy. The construction was started on the site of an earlier castle in 1123 by Henry I of England, with the 'large keep' (grand donjon). Later was added the 'small keep' (petit donjon). The tower built in the first quarter of the 12th century contained a hall, chapel, and a room for the lord, but no small rooms for a complicated household arrangement; in this way, it was similar to towers at Corfe, Norwich, and Portchester, all in England. In 1202 Arthur I, Duke of Brittany was King John of England's nephew, was imprisoned in Falaise castle's keep. According to contemporaneous chronicler Ralph of Coggeshall, John ordered two of his servants to mutilate the duke. Hugh de Burgh was in charge of guarding Arthur and refused to let him be mutilated, but to demoralise Arthur's supporters was to announce his death. The circumstances of Arthur's death are unclear, though he probably died in 1203.

In about 1207, after having conquered Normandy, Philip II Augustus ordered the building of a new cylindrical keep. It was later named the Talbot Tower (Tour Talbot) after the English commander responsible for its repair during the Hundred Years' War. It is a tall round tower, similar design to the towers built at Gisors and the medieval Louvre.Possession of the castle changed hands several times during the Hundred Years' War. The castle was deserted during the 17th century. Since 1840, Château de Falaise has been recognised as a monument historique by the French Ministry of Culture.

A programme of restoration was carried out between 1870 and 1874. The castle suffered due to bombardment during the Second World War in the battle for the Falaise pocket in 1944, but the three keeps were unscathed.