St. Gallus and Ulrich Church

Kißlegg, Germany

The Parish Church of St. Gallus and Ulrich was built in 1734-1738 by Johann Georg Fischer through the conversion of a Gothic church predecessor. It was extensively renovated between 1974 and 1980. The church contains a Madonna of 1623 (attributed to Hans Zürn the Elder), a baroque pulpit of divination Johann Wilhelm (1745) and numerous tombs of the 16th and 17th century. The church also has a valuable treasure of silver (1741-1755) from the workshop of the Augsburg silversmith Franz Christoph Mäderl.

The church also contains a purported relic of Saint Clemens that is in fact an example of a so-called catacomb saint, a corpse that has been taken from the Roman Catacombs, decorated, given a fictitious name, and presented as the relic of a Roman Catholic saint.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1734-1738
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Thirty Years War & Rise of Prussia (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

J Ra (19 months ago)
A beautiful church, albeit a bit squat because of the width of the church. Nonetheless, the interior is very nicely designed. There is a lot to discover and marvel at. A beautifully designed nativity scene can also be admired during the Christmas season.
J Ra (19 months ago)
A beautiful church, albeit a bit squat because of the width of the church. Nonetheless, the interior is very nicely designed. There is a lot to discover and marvel at. A beautifully designed nativity scene can also be admired during the Christmas season.
Zbigniew “Zibi” Buczek (2 years ago)
Only one
Zbigniew “Zibi” Buczek (2 years ago)
Only one
Cassian Jakobs (2 years ago)
The Kißlegg church is one of the particularly worth seeing in this region. The artistic conception and execution leave you amazed once again. Some of the image motifs are revealed to the viewer, otherwise a very nice art guide from the Josef Fink publishing house will help. One of the special features is the silver plating of the stucco. There is a lot to discover in this beautiful parish church.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Petersberg Citadel

The Petersberg Citadel is one of the largest extant early-modern citadels in Europe and covers the whole north-western part of the Erfurt city centre. It was built after 1665 on Petersberg hill and was in military use until 1963. It dates from a time when Erfurt was ruled by the Electors of Mainz and is a unique example of the European style of fortress construction. Beneath the citadel is an underground maze of passageways that can be visited on guided tours organised by Erfurt Tourist Office.

The citadel was originally built on the site of a medieval Benedictine Monastery and the earliest parts of the complex date from the 12th century. Erfurt has also been ruled by Sweden, Prussia, Napoleon, the German Empire, the Nazis, and post-World War II Soviet occupying forces, and it was part of the German Democratic Republic (East Germany). All of these regimes used Petersberg Citadel and had an influence on its development. The baroque fortress was in military use until 1963. Since German reunification in 1990, the citadel has undergone significant restoration and it is now open to the public as a historic site.