St. Martin’s Chapel stands above an old mountain pass that may have even existed in the La Tène period (5th–1st centuries B.C.). If that was the case, the chapel represents a link between Celtic and early Christian culture in this region. Archaeological excavations in 1958 showed that, on the site of the present chapel, there was a religious building as early as the time around 800 A.D. perhaps a heathen spring shrine. The same investigations uncovered a basin that, if this was in fact a religious building, could have been a font.

From the exposed foundations, the appearance of this first building was able to be reconstructed. It consisted of a sacred space, 4.20 by 4.20 metres in area, and an attached baptismal room with two windows. According to the report of the 1958 restoration, this layout is similar to that of St. Wendelin’s Chapel (600 A.D.) in Cazis in the Swiss canton of Graubünden.

In historical documents, the elevation of a forest chapel to the status of a church by the abbey of St. Margaret is recorded in 915, but it is not clear if that refers to this earliest building. It could also refer to a chapel, recorded in a papal bull of 1178 by Pope Alexander III, that was erected on a high mountain by the municipality of Furtwangen.

In the Middle Ages a new chapel was built using the old foundations and possibly parts of the outer walls. This probably dates to the Late Gothic period. After the chapel had been partially destroyed during the Thirty Years' War, a new roof and a new ceiling were built. The centre part of this has survived and bears the date 1672.

In the chapel there are other dates, some of which, thanks to the restoration work (Haas 1997) have been able to be correctly attributed: the retable dates to the year 1705, and the date of 1905 above the door lintel indicates the restoration measures of that time. The date of 1460 that was painted on the retable until the 1995-97 restoration was classified as incorrect.

Since the beginning of the 19th century, the chapel has been owned by the Kolmen farm. However, in 1848 it was converted into a utility building: extensions and alterations were made so that it had a stable, hayloft, shed, toilet and celler. Even the tower was replaced by a chimney.

The appearance of the present chapel dates back to an account that, in 1900, the Kolmenhof farmer made a vow that he would honour God and reinstate the former chapel as a place of worship if God would free him and his family from economic hardship. He appears to have been heard because, in 1905-06, the chapel was largely returned to its original state, a turret being replaced in its original position. In 1906 the chapel was rededicated.

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Details

Founded: 800/1672
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Part of The Frankish Empire (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

stojan genov (3 years ago)
Source du Danube beau site a voir pour une excursion
Nicola Antoniol (3 years ago)
Raggiunta a piedi dopo una bellissima passeggiata fra prati e boschi di un'oretta circa (in scioltezza) da Schonwald, è vicinissima alla Donauquelle (quella vera, non quella turistica ...) immersa nel verde. Per chi ama passeggiare e poi godersi una birra fresca al vicino Biergarden ne vale davvero la pena!
Tito Beauval (3 years ago)
Petite église perchée en haut de la montagne, entourée d'une multitude de sapins, elle s'intègre parfaitement dans le paysage. À voir absolument
Rüdiger Plaßmann (3 years ago)
Kleine Kapelle in der direkten Nähe der Donauquelle. Schön anzuschauen
Cristian Pintea (3 years ago)
O locatie deosebită pt cei care vor sa scape de aglomeratie urbana! Izvorul Dunarii e la doi pasi iar un pastrav proaspat gasiti mereu la restaurantul de vis a vis. Frumos amenajat linistit, puteti sa luati si o amintire cu voi din interiorul capelei
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