Lazise Castle Ruins

Lazise, Italy

This fortified town of Lazise was first mentioned in a document dated 983 AD, yet the present castle was erected during the reign of Bartolomeo and Antonio della Scala, as evidenced by the fact that the castle bears their initials in several places. The castle was at one time protected by draw-bridges and heavy gates. Judging by its size, the castle presumably served to offer protection (in time of strife) not only to the inhabitants of Lazise, but to those of the outlying districts as well. The size of the nearby military port also tends to support this theory.

During the period of Venetian domination, two fully-armed galleons were anchored here, yet by the end of the 16th century, the fortress no longer served as a military base and Venice handed it over first to Lazise and then to some noble families in the area.

Villa Bernini – Buri now comprises the castle and a park, the latter having been created when the port’s walls were taken down.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

Via Castello 13, Lazise, Italy
See all sites in Lazise

Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.tourism.verona.it

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Cristina Verona (11 months ago)
Lazise, a medieval town with some of the best preserved walls. Walk through its cobbled streets, enjoy the blue of the lake!
Uber Bortolini (2 years ago)
This place duringvthe sunset is fantastic
Bart Konings (2 years ago)
We came here when I was a child. Still nice to see but it's not open for visitors. That's unfortunate.
Fritz Hautsch (2 years ago)
It's breathtaking. A must see!
Mark Brolly (2 years ago)
Quaint little town with lots of shops and eating places
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Late Baroque Town of Ragusa

The eight towns in south-eastern Sicily, including Ragusa, were all rebuilt after 1693 on or beside towns existing at the time of the earthquake which took place in that year. They represent a considerable collective undertaking, successfully carried out at a high level of architectural and artistic achievement. Keeping within the late Baroque style of the day, they also depict distinctive innovations in town planning and urban building. Together with seven other cities in the Val di Noto, it is part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

In 1693 Ragusa was devastated by a huge earthquake, which killed some 5,000 inhabitants. Following this catastrophe the city was largely rebuilt, and many Baroque buildings from this time remain in the city. Most of the population moved to a new settlement in the former district of Patro, calling this new municipality 'Ragusa Superiore' (Upper Ragusa) and the ancient city 'Ragusa Inferiore' (Lower Ragusa). The two cities remained separated until 1926, when they were fused together to become a provincial capital in 1927.