Dun Ara was a stronghold of the MacKinnon clan who held the land here from 1354 onwards. The castle was still in use until the 17th century when it was abandoned. The castle was probably built on the site of a previous Dun or fort. The castle had a surrounding wall protecting a central keep or building on the main outcrop of rock. The location was valuable as it protected a harbour of boat landing as well.

The castle was fortified by enclosing the entire rock summit with a curtain-wall of stone and lime, which varies from about 1.3 m to 1.8 m in thickness. It is best preserved on the north-east side, where it rises to a maximum height of 1.8 m, but little remains on the south-west and south-east sides. The masonry was built with coarse, lime mortar, much of it has washed out of the facework giving it the appearance of dry-stone walling. It is possible that in places the lower courses of masonry pre-date the medieval castle and belong to an earlier fort that occupied the same site. The entrance is on the south-east side.

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Founded: 14th century
Category: Ruins in United Kingdom

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Krischan Peucker (2 years ago)
Short walk from the Glengorm Coffee Shop. Not much to see but a great view of thr coastline. And the cakes at the coffee shop are worth it.
Nigel Westwood (2 years ago)
Unique wild swimming spot
Maurice Thomson (2 years ago)
Hard to imagine a castle on top of rock outcrop but if you look close you can still see parts of the walls. Great scenery around area good walk down from Glengorm castle.
Michael Parker (3 years ago)
Great little basalt knoll with remains of fort clearly visible on top. A scramble to get up and back down, wonderful views from top.
Stuart Daniel (3 years ago)
Great place for wandering around, past sheep and highland coos to a beautiful seascape. Great views of land and sea
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