Kilravock Castle was originally built around 1460 and has been the seat of the Clan Rose since that time. The castle is a composite of a 15th-century tower house and several later additions. The lands were owned by the Boscoe family and it passed via marriage of Andrew Boscoe to his wife Elizabeth Bissett of the Bissett family in the 12th century, after Bosco's death his widow then deposed the lands via marriage of their daughter Mary Boscoe to Hugh II de Ros of the Rose family in the 13th century.

The keep dates from around 1460, when the then baron of Kilravock was granted a license to build by the Lord of the Isles. This was extended in the 17th century, with the addition of a square stair tower, and the south range. The north and west sides of the quadrangle were added later. Mary, Queen of Scots, was received at the castle in 1562, and Prince Charles Edward Stuart was entertained four days before the battle of Culloden. His enemy, the Duke of Cumberland, visited soon after the battle, and Robert Burns came here in September 1787.

Kilravock Castle has been continuously tenanted by the Roses, a family of Norman origin, who arrived in Britain with William the Conqueror. They settled at Kilravock in 1293, since which date son has succeeded father without the interposition of a collateral heir, an instance of direct descent unique in Scottish history.

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Highland, United Kingdom
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Details

Founded: c. 1460
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Matthew Rose (2 years ago)
This is my ancestral home. I’ve visited in 2006 When it was a B&B. It was absolutely charming. I’m hoping that the grounds and interior of the home have been kept well. It has a wonderful history. I hope one day it opens to the public again.
Joe Dodd (2 years ago)
Beautiful place with interesting walks around it
Eric Long (2 years ago)
This was a bed and breakfast when I stayed in 1984. Completely enchanting and more than you could imagine.
Johannes Q. (2 years ago)
Viel zu sehen gibt es hier leider nicht. Alles wirkt etwas verlassen und ungepflegt. Dieser Ort hat etwas Unheimliches und Verwunschenes an sich, lohnt sich aber eher nicht für einen Abstecher. Eher gruselig und ein Schauplatz für einen Horrorfilm.
Clay Wolfenden-Fisher (2 years ago)
Rose family Castle. It wasn't open when we arrived but we walked around the place and gardens for hours.
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