Tongeren Béguinage

Tongeren, Belgium

Tongeren Béguinage, founded in 1257 is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1998. Its enclosure wall was destroyed in the 19th century: it separated the beguinage from the rest of the city and thus guaranteed peace and quiet for the small religion-inspired community. In the 17th century the beguinage counted some 300 beguines; it was also able to survive the 1677 fire that destroyed most of the city. In the center of the béguinage stands the Saint Catherine Church, built in 1294 and one of the oldest churches in the entire city.

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Details

Founded: 1257
Category: Miscellaneous historic sites in Belgium

More Information

www.tongeren.be

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rafaël Elsen (2 years ago)
Very nice to visit. A confrontation with a piece of history that we did not know. Beautiful location.
Nick Lieten (2 years ago)
Boeiend en mooi museum!
Ammadeus (2 years ago)
Beautiful old place. The museum is small but interesting.
Pierre Thijs (2 years ago)
Very beautiful and educational!!
Miranda Muls (3 years ago)
Heel goede gids, plezant de 2 uren waren zo voorbij.
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