Church of Our Lady of Leliendaal

Mechelen, Belgium

Our Lady of Leliendaal Church was originally owned by the Norbertine St. Michael's Abbey in Antwerp. The architect was Lucas Faydherbe, he came from Mechelen, was the nephew of Lucas Franchoys the Younger and studied with Peter Paul Rubens in Antwerp. In 1662, the foundation stone was laid. Construction was delayed on multiple occasions, because the façade tilted dangerously forward. Therefore, in 1664, the façade was demolished and rebuilt. In 1670, the first Mass was said and in 1674 it was solemnly inaugurated.

In the early 19th century, during the Napoleanic wars, the church was seriously neglected and half of it was turned into a hospice for the poor of the city. The furnishings were sold and holes were made in the gables for people to be able to see out and over the church to help defend it against attack. A wall was placed in the church between the second and third windows for the establishment of an infirmary.

In 1834, it re-opened under the administration of the Jesuits. Through the cooperation of the nearby Minor Seminary and the Civil Hospices, it was restored and equipped with new furniture and the internal walls were removed. In 1900-1901, the Jesuits changed the floor plan and moved the choir to the gallery in the west of the church. Later in the 20th-century, a sacristy was constructed in the south west part of the church. Also, a grotto to Our Lady of Lourdes was built and new furniture was purchased.

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Address

Bruul 56, Mechelen, Belgium
See all sites in Mechelen

Details

Founded: 1662
Category: Religious sites in Belgium

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anne-Marie Lysens (18 months ago)
Emiel Van Leerberghe (19 months ago)
Deze kerk heeft een oude en zware geschiedenis te torsen. Het is een barokke kerk en het ontwerp is van de jaren 1617-1697.Spijtig dat het klooster zware schade leed tijdens de tweede wereldoorlog.
Werner Van Herle (2 years ago)
Danny Danckaert (3 years ago)
Mooie kerk met fraai interieur
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