The Ossmannstedt estate is closely linked with the name of Christoph Martin Wieland (1733-1813). The poet purchased the Baroque complex of buildings and park in 1797 and lived there with his family for six years (see Wieland estate in Ossmannstedt). Even in Wieland’s day, very little of the original Baroque garden remained, as the previous owners had used the three terraces sloping down to the river Ilm for agricultural purposes. Wieland’s happy rural life with his garden came to an abrupt end with the deaths in Ossmannstedt of Sophie Brentano and his wife Anna Dorothea, and the poet moved back to Weimar in 1803. According to his wish, Wieland was buried besides his wife and Sophie Brentano in the park of the Ossmannstedt estate after his death in 1813. From 1859 to 1896, the house belonged to the family of the privy counsellor John Grant of Glen Morrison. Their numerous guests included Grand Duke Carl Alexander, Walther von Goethe, Franz Liszt and the descendants of Herder and Wieland.

The estate was divided during the land reform at the end of the 1940s, the service buildings and the enclosure wall were torn down and the manor was converted into a school. Thorough and extensive restoration work was carried out on the property between 1968 and 1974 and again between 2003 and 2005. Although the upper parterre was converted into a sports ground in 1947, the original terracing is still recognisable today. Particularly well worth seeing is the well house with its large pool opposite the residential building. The Baroque grotto with the dolphin-shaped waterspout is surrounded by flower beds laid out in accordance with historical designs. Wieland’s brief period of residence in Ossmannstedt and his grave in the park have added substantially to the significance of the estate, which occupies six hectares.

Wieland Manor is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site 'Classical Weimar'.

References:

Comments

Your name



User Reviews

Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Fisherman's Bastion

Fisherman's Bastion is a terrace in neo-Gothic and neo-Romanesque style situated on the Buda bank of the Danube, on the Castle hill in Budapest, around Matthias Church. It was designed and built between 1895 and 1902 on the plans of Frigyes Schulek. Construction of the bastion destabilised the foundations of the neighbouring 13th century Dominican Church which had to be pulled down. Between 1947–48, the son of Frigyes Schulek, János Schulek, conducted the other restoration project after its near destruction during World War II.

From the towers and the terrace a panoramic view exists of Danube, Margaret Island, Pest to the east and the Gellért Hill.

Its seven towers represent the seven Magyar tribes that settled in the Carpathian Basin in 896.

The Bastion takes its name from the guild of fishermen that was responsible for defending this stretch of the city walls in the Middle Ages. It is a viewing terrace, with many stairs and walking paths.

A bronze statue of Stephen I of Hungary mounted on a horse, erected in 1906, can be seen between the Bastion and the Matthias Church. The pedestal was made by Alajos Stróbl, based on the plans of Frigyes Schulek, in Neo-Romanesque style, with episodes illustrating the King's life.