Erfurt Synagogue

Erfurt, Germany

The Erfurt Synagogue was built c. 1094. It is thought to be the oldest synagogue building still standing in Europe. Thanks to the extensive preservation of the original structure, it has a special place in the history of art and architecture and is among the most impressive and highly rated architectural monuments in Erfurt and Thuringia. The synagogue was constructed during the Middle Ages on the via regia, one of the major European trade routes, at the heart of the historical old quarter very close to the Merchants Bridge and the town hall. Many parts of the structure still remain today, including all four thick outer walls, the Roman­esque gemel window, the Gothic rose window and the entrance to the synagogue room.

After extensive restoration, the building was reopened in 2009. On display in the exhibition rooms is an collection of medieval treasures discovered during archaeological excavations. This includes 3,140 silver coins, 14 silver ingots, approx. 6,000 works of goldsmithery from the 13th and 14th centuries and an intricately worked wedding ring of the period, of which only two others are known to exist anywhere in the world. A mikveh (Jewish bath) has been excavated close by (13th/14th century). The Old Synagogue, the Small Synagogue and two Jewish cemeteries together form a network of historical buildings and sites which vividly portray the role of Jewish life in the history of Erfurt.

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Address

Fischmarkt 22, Erfurt, Germany
See all sites in Erfurt

Details

Founded: c. 1094
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Salian Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marcus Moore (2 years ago)
Excellent
Prashant Pidaparthi (2 years ago)
Historical place that gives you an idea of the Synagogue in olden times and how it evolved with time. I took the morning tour where there tour guide explained well. Totally recommend the tour!
Ecem Dilek (2 years ago)
Audio guides are helpful, but there is not much left in terms of architecture.
David Y (2 years ago)
Very interesting historical location.
ANDER FUENTES-ARRIZABALAGA (3 years ago)
A beautiful sight of the Hebrew culture in Europe. The oldest synagogue in the continent. A witness of a brilliant past.
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