Erfurt Cathedral

Erfurt, Germany

Erfurt Cathedral, dedicated to St. Mary, is a late Gothic cathedral which replaced the church built on this site for Bishop Boniface in 742. Martin Luther was ordained in the cathedral in 1507.

The architecture of the Erfurt Cathedral is mainly Gothic and stems from around the 14th and 15th centuries. There are many things of note as far as the architecture is concerned, not least the stained glass windows and furnishings of the interior of the cathedral. The central spire of the three towers that sit aloft the cathedral harbours the Maria Gloriosa which, at the time of its casting by Geert van Wou in 1497, was the world's largest free-swinging bell. It is the largest existing medieval bell in the world. It is known to have purity and beauty of tone.

The cathedral houses many rare and rich furnishings and sculptures, including the tomb of the bigamous Count von Gleichen, accompanied by both of his wives, a stucco altar, a bronze candelebra of Romanesque antiquity called Wolfram, the oldest free standing cast work in Germany, and, out on the porch, several statues of the Wise and Foolish Virgins.

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Address

Domstufen 1, Erfurt, Germany
See all sites in Erfurt

Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Behrouz Safaei (13 months ago)
Loved it, big and beautiful
Sunny Milbert (13 months ago)
Great cathedral!
Oliver Sasse (13 months ago)
A truly amazing and impressive architecture of the early Middle Ages is the Marien Dom of city Erfurt in central Germany / county Thüringen. In that huge cathedral you will find the biggest swinging church ⛪️ bell
Paco Hernández (14 months ago)
Beautiful architecture. When you reach the top of the stairs you can visit two churches. Both are great.
Tito Kovacevic (15 months ago)
Nice historical place to visit! Right now they doong some construction work.
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