Erfurt Cathedral

Erfurt, Germany

Erfurt Cathedral, dedicated to St. Mary, is a late Gothic cathedral which replaced the church built on this site for Bishop Boniface in 742. Martin Luther was ordained in the cathedral in 1507.

The architecture of the Erfurt Cathedral is mainly Gothic and stems from around the 14th and 15th centuries. There are many things of note as far as the architecture is concerned, not least the stained glass windows and furnishings of the interior of the cathedral. The central spire of the three towers that sit aloft the cathedral harbours the Maria Gloriosa which, at the time of its casting by Geert van Wou in 1497, was the world's largest free-swinging bell. It is the largest existing medieval bell in the world. It is known to have purity and beauty of tone.

The cathedral houses many rare and rich furnishings and sculptures, including the tomb of the bigamous Count von Gleichen, accompanied by both of his wives, a stucco altar, a bronze candelebra of Romanesque antiquity called Wolfram, the oldest free standing cast work in Germany, and, out on the porch, several statues of the Wise and Foolish Virgins.

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Address

Domstufen 1, Erfurt, Germany
See all sites in Erfurt

Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Valerio Di Monte (16 months ago)
Very nice and well maintained . You must visit it.
Jiří Kropáč (17 months ago)
Impresive and dominating cathedral. Recommended
Christopher Cotton (17 months ago)
Grand but simple catheral where Luther was ordained.
Andreas Ludwig (17 months ago)
Absolutely stunning place of history. Great from outside and within, lots of Christian history to discover.
Domitian Ecker (2 years ago)
It honestly looks way nicer from the outside than the inside. Especial when it snows there is a very special, middle ages feeling too be found here.
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