Schiller Residence

Weimar, Germany

Friedrich Schiller purchased the house where today is known as Schillerstrasse in Weimar for himself and his family in 1802. The house was originally built in 1777. He had to go deep into debt to finance the purchase. The family lived in the house until Charlotte von Schiller’s death in 1826. It became municipal property in 1847, and in the same year also became the first publicly accessible memorial to a poet in Germany. It was severely damaged by bombing in 1945, but was reopened in 1946.

The house combines authentic items from Schiller’s properties with comparable additions and contemporary décor. It allows the visitor to get a feeling for contemporary tastes and living conditions as well as the atmosphere of work, living and domesticity in Schiller Residence. The ground floor comprises the hall, kitchen and servant’s room. An exhibition screen documents the history of the house and gives an insight into everyday life in the Schiller household. The living room, the rooms occupied by Schiller’s wife Charlotte and the sleeping chambers of their daughters are located on the first floor. The most outstanding features of these rooms include a coffee pot made of Thuringian porcelain, a wedding present from Schiller’s mother-in-law, cups, a tea machine and champagne glasses from the family properties. Small drawings and cutouts by Schiller’s children are on display in the nursery. The rooms used by Schiller until his early death in 1805 are located separately in the attic. Visitors are welcomed by a copy of the most famous portrait of Schiller, painted by Anton Graff. The walls in the adjoining salon are decorated with pictures which belonged to Schiller. One of the most striking objects from Schiller’s properties on display is the imposing bust of Schiller sculpted by Johann Heinrich Dannecker. This study, most of the furnishings in which are originals, is the most important and authentic room in the house. This is the room where the poet completed his dramas The Bride of Messina and William Tell. His last work Demetrius is merely fragmentary. The exhibition Schiller in Thuringia informs visitors about the poet’s life and work in Bauerbach, Rudolstadt, Jena and Weimar.

Schiller Residence is situated in the same building as the Schiller Museum. For further information on the Schiller Museum please see Schiller Museum.

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Details

Founded: 1777
Category: Museums in Germany
Historical period: Emerging States (Germany)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Christiane Tepper (2 years ago)
Wir haben eine Führung mitgemacht, ca 1 Std. Das war gut, man erfährt viel über Schiller und seine Familie und wie er gelebt hat . Sehr zu empfehlen.
Andrew Niblett (3 years ago)
Very worth while spending several hours here for an interesting insight in to some German culture.
Omid Paydar (4 years ago)
Very nice and peaceful place
Abel (4 years ago)
Very interesting museum, sadly it's in German only unless you use an audio guide. So if you don't like using audio guides you're stuck with German.
Gordana Podvezanec (5 years ago)
All you need to know about Schiller - in German only.
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