Blutenburg Castle

Munich, Germany

Blutenburg Castle is an old ducal country seat in the west of Munich. The castle was built between two arms of the River Würm for Duke Albert III, Duke of Bavaria in 1438–39 as a hunting-lodge, replacing an older castle burned down in war. The origin of this castle is a moated castle of the 13th century. The core of this castle was a residential tower, the remains of which were uncovered in 1981. The fortress was first mentioned in writing only in 1432.

Albert's son, Duke Sigismund of Bavaria, ordered extensions of the castle beginning in 1488; he died here in 1501. The main building became derelict during the Thirty Years War, but was rebuilt in 1680–81. The castle is still surrounded by a ring wall with three towers and a gate tower. The defensive character of the castle, however, was with the reconstruction in 17th Century significantly reduced. The plant was already at that time no longer defensible.

Sigismund of Bavaria also ordered the construction of the palace chapel, a splendid masterpiece of late Gothic style which still has preserved its stained-glass windows, along with the altars with three paintings created in 1491 by Jan Polack. The cycle of the statues of the apostles on the side walls was built around 1490/95.

Since 1983 the International Youth Library (Internationale Jugendbibliothek) has been housed in Blutenburg Castle. The Blutenburg concerts are well known.

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Address

Seldweg, Munich, Germany
See all sites in Munich

Details

Founded: 1438-1439
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Peder Baner (3 years ago)
We had a good lunch there.
Fabian Linack (3 years ago)
Great location (esp. In the snow). Mostly known for the wine festival, but also the restaurant schlossschanke offers good quality and is perfect for a Sunday afternoon combined with a walk around the area. They also offer dinner in the special castle environment.
Cosmin Mihoreanu (4 years ago)
Very interesting and cool atmosphere, delicious food.
2511pixel (4 years ago)
A wonderful place amidst the large city. Advisable to steady the nerves after an f.e. „Oktoberfest-visit". A tiny and a cozy small chapel in the patio. It caused me to pray, though I´m not that devout. There is also a restaurant, but I was not there. The architecture is very nice and peaceful surroundings are completing the setting.
abhijit jain (4 years ago)
Very silent nice place, some apple trees around. Small lake and big garden. No many people visit. I really enjoyed silent and quiet environment.
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