Walhalla Memorial

Donaustauf, Germany

The Walhalla is a hall of fame that honors laudable and distinguished people in German history. The hall is a neo-classical building above the Danube River. The Walhalla is named for the Valhalla of Norse mythology. It was conceived in 1807 by Crown Prince Ludwig in order to support the then-gathering momentum for the unification of the many German states. Following his accession to the throne of Bavaria, construction took place between 1830 and 1842 under the supervision of the architect Leo von Klenze.

The memorial displays some 65 plaques and 130 busts covering 2,000 years of history, beginning with Arminius, victor at the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest in 9 AD.

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Details

Founded: 1830-1842
Category: Statues in Germany
Historical period: German Confederation (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Maura K. (11 months ago)
Interesting place with nice views. Short walking distances (stairs) from parking lot.
Jørn Nielsen (11 months ago)
Fantastic view and a very special place.It is a must-see if you are in the region
Stefania Maso (12 months ago)
They say it is one of Germany's most important national monuments of the 19th century. It sits on top of a hill and commands an incredible view of the Danube River and valley. Parking seems to be free. Its without a doubt worth the visit, you also get awesome views where you can simply sit and relax.
Naveen Reddy (2 years ago)
Awesome place to go in summers with bier and also laze around. Awesome view facing the Donau. Best experienced by walk from Regensburg town, along he river. Sometimes, by river cruise.
Adam Duff (2 years ago)
Really nice concept to have famous historical German busts. Nice also to view the building.
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