Regensburg Old Town

Regensburg, Germany

Located on the Danube River, the Old Town of Regensburg is an exceptional example of a central-European medieval trading centre, which illustrates an interchange of cultural and architectural influences. The property encompasses the city centre on the south side of the river, two long islands in the Danube, the so-called Wöhrde (from the old German word waird, meaning island or peninsula), and the area of the former charity hospital St Katharina in Stadtamhof, a district incorporated into the city of Regensburg only in 1924. A navigable canal, part of the European waterway of the Rhine-Main-Danube canal, forms the northern boundary of Stadtamhof.

A notable number of buildings of outstanding quality testify to its political, religious, and economic significance from the 9th century. The historic fabric reflects some two millennia of structural continuity and includes ancient Roman, Romanesque, and Gothic buildings. Regensburg's 11th to 13th century architecture still defines the character of the town marked by tall buildings, dark and narrow lanes, and strong fortifications. The buildings include medieval Patrician houses and towers, a large number of churches and monastic ensembles as well as the 12th century Stone Bridge.

The town is also remarkable as a meeting place of Imperial Assemblies and as the seat of the Perpetual Imperial Diet general assemblies until the 19th century. Numerous buildings testify to its history as one of the centres of the Holy Roman Empire, like the Patrician towers, large Romanesque and Gothic church buildings and monasteries – St Emmeram, Alte Kapelle, Niedermünster and St Jakob - as well as the cathedral St Peter and the late Gothic town hall.

The medieval centre of the city is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and a testimony of the city's status as cultural centre of southern Germany in the middle ages. Regensburg is among the top sights and travel attractions in Germany.

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Regensburg, Germany
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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Historic city squares, old towns and villages in Germany
Historical period: Salian Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Susann Lindner (17 months ago)
Ein gut erhaltenes und immer noch genutztes Rathaus was man mal gesehen haben sollte.
Kyoungwan Hong (18 months ago)
Kleine Gassen sind hübsche Städte
竹原幸一郎 (19 months ago)
ガイドツアーによる見学です。9時から最初のツアーが始まりますが、チケット売場の観光案内所も9時から始まります。笑い。準備中のスタッフに声を掛けたら、8時50分に対応してもらえました。 日本語のオーディオガイドがあります。必ず借りましょう。自由見学なら無くてもいいですが、ガイドツアーだと、自由に移動できず 間が持ちません。
Pavol Cvíčela (2 years ago)
Old Town alebo Staré mesto je ukážkou ako vyzerá zachovalé historické mesto v Nemecku. Prechádzka po dlažobných kockách, história na Vás dýcha odvšadiaľ. Veľmi pekné pamiatky čakajú iba na zvedavých turistov.
İhsan Yeneroğlu (3 years ago)
Must see! Highly recommended to visit.
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