Regensburg Sausage Kitchen

Regensburg, Germany

The Historic Sausage Kitchen of Regensburg (Wurstküche) is notable as perhaps the oldest continuously open public restaurant in the world. In 1135 a building was erected as the construction office for the Regensburg stone bridge. When the bridge was finished in 1146 AD, the building became a restaurant named Garkueche auf dem Kranchen ('cookshop near the crane') as it was situated near the then river port. Dockers, sailors and the staff of the nearby St. Peter cathedral workshop were the regulars for the centuries to come. The present building at this location dates from the 17th century, but archaeological evidence has confirmed the existence of a previous building from the 12th century with about the same dimensions.

Until ca. AD 1800, the specialty was boiled meat, but when the family who currently own the restaurant took over in 1806, charcoal grilled sausages were introduced as the main dish offered. The kitchen still operates today and serves 6,000 sausages to guests daily.

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Details

Founded: 1135
Category:
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Fasih Chishti (14 months ago)
The place has a nice ambiance facing riverview on one side and glamorous old buildings across the road.
Oleksandr Levenko (14 months ago)
The oldest "fast food" in the world on the river side. Actually nothing special. Ordinary sausages that I can buy in my city.
Ágnes (16 months ago)
It's an alright place with overpriced food because of its history. The sausages are rather basic, the dish has lots of cumin, which some people like, some don't. Sweet mustard is an interesting local twist, but again, not for everyone.
John Gary (16 months ago)
Really tasty, simple bratwursts. We had take out, paid in cash then sat by the river to eat. Couldn't be more basic and simple to enjoy a meal with loved ones.
Ug Ne (18 months ago)
Delicious but severely overpriced because of the place's history, which I wouldn't consider justified because you won't really leave with a full stomach compared to other restaurants with similar price ranges.
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