Altomünster Abbey

Altomünster, Germany

A small monastery was founded in Altomünster by Saint Alto, a wandering monk, in about 750. The vita of Alto, likely written by Otloh of St. Emmeram after 1056 and ostensibly based on oral knowledge (written lore having been lost through plunder), reports that the monastery was visited by Saint Boniface, who dedicated the church. Another 11th-century text notes that Boniface also dedicated the church in nearby Benediktbeuern Abbey.

Sometime before 1000 the Welfs enlarged it and made it into a Benedictine abbey. Welf I, Duke of Bavaria resettled the monks in 1056 to the newly founded Weingarten Abbey in Altdorf, while the nuns formerly resident at Altdorf moved to Altomünster, where they lived until the monastery was dissolved in 1488 by Pope Innocent VIII.

In 1496 by grant of Duke George the Rich the Bridgettines of Maihingen were permitted to establish a Bridgettine monastery at Altomünster. The monastery was dissolved on 18 March 1803 during the secularisation of Bavaria, but was later revived. Today, along with a settlement in Bremen, it is the last Bridgettine monastery in Germany. Nearby is a museum of the history of the Bridgettine Order.

Two gospel lectionary created for the abbey in the 12th century are held by the Bavarian State Library.

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Details

Founded: 750 AD
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Part of The Frankish Empire (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Branco Stark (8 months ago)
Sehr eindrucksvoll. Muss man gesehen haben
Melwin Brames (11 months ago)
Es ist ein sehr schönes und altes Kloster welches leider Leer steht.
Klaus Jürgens (12 months ago)
Toller Ort!
Doris Demmel (2 years ago)
Das Kloster wurde leider geschlossen. Man kann aber die Kirche besichtigen. Es gibt auch einen schönen Kloster Kräutergarten. Am Haupteingang der Kirche nach links den Weg hinter kann man einen verstecken Durchgang finden.
gill christopher (3 years ago)
Altomuenster is so beautiful and Peaceful I always feel good when i am there
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