Amorbach Abbey

Amorbach, Germany

Amorbach Abbey was one of four Carolingian foundations intended to establish Christianity in the region of the Odenwald. It is said to take its name from Amor, a disciple of Saint Pirmin, regarded as the founder. The abbey was consecrated in 734. By 800 it had become a Reichsabtei, the abbot being directly answerable to Charlemagne. Pepin united it to the Bishopric of Würzburg, although control of it was much disputed by the Bishops of Mainz.

The abbey played an important role in the clearing and settlement of the vast tracts of forest in which it was located, and in the evangelisation of other areas, notably Saxony: many of the abbots of the missionary centre of Verden an der Aller - later to become the Bishops of Verden - had previously been monks at Amorbach. It was severely damaged by the invasions of the Hungarians in the 10th century.

In 1525 the buildings were stormed and plundered during the German Peasants' War by forces under the command of Götz von Berlichingen. During the Thirty Years' War the abbey was attacked by the Swedes in 1632, was dissolved for a short time between 1632 and 1634 and the lands taken by a local landowner, and although it was afterwards restored and the lands regained, there followed a period of decline and poverty.

In 1656 the Bishops of Mainz and Würzburg reached agreement: Amorbach was transferred into the control, both spiritual and territorial, of the Archbishop of Mainz, and significant building works followed. In the 1740s the site was completely refurbished in the Rococo style, of which it remains a significant example, under the supervision of Maximilian von Welsch. Further extensive construction and decoration was undertaken in the 1780s, including in 1782 the installation of what was at the time the biggest organ in the world.

The patrons were the Virgin Mary, with Saints Simplicius, Faustinus and Beatrix.

The abbey was finally dissolved in 1803 and given with its lands as compensation for lost territories to the Princes of Leiningen, who still live there today. Jurisdiction over the abbey and its territories passed to the government of the Kingdom of Bavaria in 1816.

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Address

Am Konvent, Amorbach, Germany
See all sites in Amorbach

Details

Founded: 734 AD
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Part of The Frankish Empire (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sand Witch (2 months ago)
Today (March 29th at 11am) we had a wonderful tour of the abbey and its premises. The guide was personable and took the time to explain everything in detail. It was important to me to mention this again in particular, because unfortunately there was a very bad-tempered old lady in the group who was constantly complaining and was obviously very dissatisfied with everything. Dear woman...who offers these tours: you're doing a great job, don't let people like that spoil your joy, please keep it up! I can absolutely recommend the tour.
chrom michel (2 years ago)
Super
Remy Xenstein (Jurj Remus) (2 years ago)
That place is amazing! International boutique was also very interesting.
Anke Lautenbach (2 years ago)
Unfortunately only possible with admission, which would have added up for the seniors who would have liked to pause for a moment. Very impressive from the outside.
Patric Waibel (2 years ago)
Great! Magnificent equipment and spatial effect. Probably one of the most beautiful baroque churches in Germany. But the whole ensemble and the surrounding area are also well worth seeing. A visit is highly recommended.
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