Hirschhorn Castle

Hirschhorn, Germany

Hirschhorn Castle was built around 1250-1260 on land given as a fief by Lorsch Abbey, which since 1232 was in the possession of the Archbishop of Mainz. In the castle, which is fortified by walls and towers, a keep, a great hall, stables and several gates and outbuildings can still be seen.

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Details

Founded: 1250-1260
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Joerg Wehrle (21 months ago)
Hier ist es immer wieder schön, auch die Kinder haben Freude. Heute Sonne pur
Lucas Frey (22 months ago)
Super schöne Burg mit toller Aussicht über das Neckartal.
Adrian W (22 months ago)
Schöne Burg mit toller Aussicht. Leider war zum Zeitpunkt unseres Besuchs das Restaurant auf Grund von Sanierung geschlossen. Aber nichtsdestotrotz eine schöne Sehenswürdigkeit.
Gaylord Schönberger (2 years ago)
Eine tolle Burg zum erkunden. Von hier aus hat man einen wunderbaren Blick auf den Neckar. Auch wertvoll ist ja Schlossgarten. Es gibt hier wahnsinnig viel zu entdecken für Groß und Klein inklusive Aussichtsturm
Vladimir Zivanovic (2 years ago)
One of the rarer gems in Germany, perfect for a quick getaway, with loved ones. For those adventurous and not afraid of a bit climbing :)
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